Laser system onboard

Raytheon Company and the U.S. Army Apache Program Management Office, in collaboration with U.S. Special Operations Command, recently completed a successful flight test of a high energy laser system onboard an AH-64 Apache at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The demonstration marks the first time that a fully integrated laser system successfully engaged and fired on a target from a rotary-wing aircraft over a wide variety of flight regimes, altitudes and air speeds.

Raytheon, along with U.S. Army and United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), demonstrated the first-ever helicopter-based firing of High Energy Laser
Raytheon, along with U.S. Army and United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), demonstrated the first-ever helicopter-based firing of High Energy Laser

The test achieved all primary and secondary goals, providing solid experimental evidence for the feasibility of high resolution, multi-band targeting sensor performance and beam propagation supportive of High Energy Laser (HEL) capability for the rotary-wing attack mission. Additionally, the system performed as expected while tracking and directing energy on a number of targets. The design of future HEL systems will be shaped by the data collected on the impact of vibration, dust and rotor downwash on HEL beam control and steering.

«Our goal is to pull the future forward», said Art Morrish, vice president of Advanced Concept and Technologies for Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems. «This data collection shows we’re on the right track. By combining combat proven sensors, like the MTS, with multiple laser technologies, we can bring this capability to the battlefield sooner rather than later».

In this test Raytheon coupled a variant of the Multi-Spectral Targeting System (MTS), an advanced electro-optical infrared sensor, with a laser. The MTS provided targeting information, situational awareness and beam control.

Hyunmoo-type
ballistic missile

President Moon Jae-in observed the test-firing of the nation’s new ballistic missile with a maximum range of 497 miles/800 kilometers, Friday, on June 23, sending a strong warning to North Korea over its provocations.

A Hyunmoo ballistic missile with a maximum range of 497 miles/800 kilometers is launched from a mobile launch vehicle during a test-firing observed by South Korean President Moon Jae-on June 23
A Hyunmoo ballistic missile with a maximum range of 497 miles/800 kilometers is launched from a mobile launch vehicle during a test-firing observed by South Korean President Moon Jae-on June 23

The test of a Hyunmoo-type ballistic missile, which puts the whole of North Korea within striking distance, took place at the Anheung test site of the Agency for Defense Development (ADD) under the wing of the Ministry of National Defense in Taean, South Chungcheong Province.

«The missile fell precisely onto a designated target after flying a prearranged distance», presidential spokesman Park Soo-hyun said at a media briefing.

As core assets forming the Kill Chain pre-emptive strike system, the new strategic weapons will be used to attack the North’s nuclear and missile facilities in the event of war, Park noted.

The military plans to complete the development of the new missile and deploy it by the end of the year.

Spokesman Park said the latest test was the fourth of its kind. «The new missile will be operationally deployed after two more test-firings», he said.

President Moon said his visit to the test site was meaningful in that the people as well as the President could affirm the nation’s missile capabilities amid the North’s evolving missile threats.

«The people are now convinced South Korea is not behind the North in missile capabilities», Park quoted Moon as saying. «I am an advocate of dialogue with the North, but pushing for such dialogue and engaging Pyongyang will be only possible when the nation has strong national defense, which overwhelms that of the North».

Park said there had been some concerns over Moon’s visit to the test site as it could provoke the Kim Jong-un regime and complicate the situation ahead of the South Korea-U.S. summit scheduled for next week.

«The first vice chief of the National Security Office was originally planning to supervise the test-firing, but after receiving a report, Moon showed willingness to observe it in person», Park said.

If the new missile is fired from the southern resort island of Jeju, it is theoretically capable of reaching Sinuiju, a North Korean city bordering China. If fired from Pohang, North Gyeongsang Province, the missile can reach anywhere in North Korea.

The military has been developing ballistic missiles with extended firing ranges since Seoul and Washington revised the guidelines on such weapons for the South in October 2012. The revision allowed Seoul to extend the maximum range of its missiles to 497 miles/800 kilometers from the previous limit of 186.4 miles/300 kilometers.

South Korea is currently operating Hyunmoo 2A and 2B short-range ballistic missiles with maximum ranges of 186.4 miles/300 kilometers and 310.7 miles/500 kilometers, respectively; and Hyunmoo 3 cruise missiles with a range of 621.4 miles/1,000 kilometers.

Observers expect the new missile to be named the Hyunmoo 2C.

The North has conducted five missile provocations since Moon was sworn in, May 10, including a test-firing of a new type of anti-ship cruise missile, June 8.

Before this, Pyongyang fired a Scud-type ballistic missile from Wonsan, May 29, which was later assessed as an anti-ship ballistic missile. At the time, the North claimed the missile featured a new high-precision guidance system and a faster launch process.

The Kim Jong-un regime also fired an intermediate-range ballistic missile on May 14, a medium-range ballistic missile May 21 and a KN-06 surface-to-air guided missile May 27.

Defense Funding Plan

According to Reuters, the German parliament’s budget committee on Wednesday postponed a decision on a 1-billion-euro ($1.11 billion) funding package for the military, including a deal to lease Israeli-made armed drones.

The German Parliament has approved a major funding package to modernize its military after decades of neglect; it includes the construction of five new K130-class corvettes for the navy, similar to the «Ludwigshafen» seen here at sea (GE MoD photo)
The German Parliament has approved a major funding package to modernize its military after decades of neglect; it includes the construction of five new K130-class corvettes for the navy, similar to the «Ludwigshafen» seen here at sea (GE MoD photo)

The committee nonetheless approved 11 billion euros of purchases for the armed forces, including five corvette warships for two billion euros.

The Defence Ministry had warned against delays, saying the purchases were urgently needed to modernize an army weakened by years of spending cuts.

Christine Lambrecht, a lawmaker from the center-left Social Democratic Party (SPD), had earlier said that the budget committee would delay a decision on the whole funding package as her party needed more time for consultations.

Defence minister Ursula von der Leyen is eager to get the requests approved before a September 24 general election as delays could further hobble a military trying to rebuild after years of post-Cold War cuts and prepare for added responsibilities.

The SPD are junior coalition partners of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s CDU and their Bavaria-based sister party, the Christian Social Union (CSU).

After the postponement, Von der Leyen told ARD television that the procurement of the Israeli drones, favored by the military because they are compatible with models they already own, was still under discussion.

Sea trials

According to The Daily Telegraph, Britain’s largest ever warship is due to squeeze out of its dockyard for the first time as early as Monday afternoon, as the ship heads out on sea trials.

HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) set to squeeze out of dockyard for the first time
HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) set to squeeze out of dockyard for the first time

The 65,000 ton HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08) is expected to slip out of Rosyth dockyard and into open water through an exit with only 14-inch/35.5-cm clearance on either side and 20 inches/50.8 cm of water under the keel.

The aircraft carrier will then edge along the Forth under three bridges, including the landmark rail bridge, with a little over six feet to spare.

The trials mark the latest milestone in the nearly decade-long building of the Royal Navy’s two carriers, at a cost of more than £6bn. The Navy is also preparing for the warship’s first appearance to attract a concerted Russian spying effort, with submarines, ships and planes try to get a good look at the UK’s new flagship.

A Royal Navy warship is expected to escort HMS Queen Elizabeth (R08), while shore-based helicopters look out for submarines as commanders try out the warship in the North Sea and Moray Firth.

Commander Fiona Percival, head of logistics on the ship said: «The Russians will come and look, but they look at everything».

Commander Mark Deller, commander air, said the ship would be accompanied by a frigate or destroyer.

He said: «We will go where it’s best to go and not where it’s best for a Soviet nuclear to go, so the reality is we can probably look after ourselves as long as our escort is in the right place at the right time. You don’t have to hang around and endure it, you can move away and go somewhere else».

Sailors and engineers have worked round the clock getting the vessel ready. A total of 1,000 sailors and contractors will be onboard for the first six weeks of testing. Crew have spent hours each day carrying out safety drills for fires, flooding and personnel overboard. More than 650 doors and hatches have been checked to ensure they are watertight and fire safe.

50 Percent
structurally complete

On June 22, 2017, Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced that the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) grew about 70 feet/21.3 m in length with the addition of the lower stern. The lower stern was lifted into place at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division, where the second Gerald R. Ford-class aircraft carrier is now 50 percent structurally complete.

Shipbuilders at Newport News Shipbuilding lifted the lower stern of CVN-79 into place
Shipbuilders at Newport News Shipbuilding lifted the lower stern of CVN-79 into place

Like Ford, Kennedy is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form larger structural units (called «superlifts»), equipment is then installed, and the large superlifts are lifted into the dry dock using the company’s 1,050-metric ton gantry crane.

«This is a significant milestone in the ship’s construction schedule», said Mike Shawcross, Newport News’ vice president, USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) and USS Enterprise (CVN-80) aircraft carrier construction. «We are halfway through lifting the units onto the ship, and many of the units are larger and nearly all are more complete than the CVN-78 lifts were. This is one of many lessons learned from the construction of the lead ship that are helping to reduce construction costs and improve efficiencies on Kennedy».

After several days of preparations, the 932-metric ton lower stern lift took about an hour to complete, thanks to a team of about 25 shipbuilders – from riggers and the crane operator to shipwrights and ship fitters. The lower stern consists of 30 individual units and includes the ship’s rudders, steering gear rooms and electrical power distribution room. The carrier is on track to be completed with 445 lifts, which is 51 fewer than Ford and 149 fewer than USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), the last Nimitz-class carrier.

The lower stern, which weights 932 metric tons, consists of 30 individual units and includes the ship’s rudders, steering gear rooms and electrical power distribution room
The lower stern, which weights 932 metric tons, consists of 30 individual units and includes the ship’s rudders, steering gear rooms and electrical power distribution room

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
Propulsion 2 A1B* nuclear reactors, 4 shafts
Length 1,092 feet/333 m
Beam 134 feet/41 m
Flight Deck Width 256 feet/78 m
Flight Deck Square 217,796 feet2/20,234 m2
Displacement approximately 100,000 long tons full load
Speed 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h
Crew 4,539 (ship, air wing and staff)
Armament ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile), RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile), Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System)
Aircraft 75+

* – Bechtel Plant Machinery, Inc. serves the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program

Aircraft Carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) Reaches 50 Percent Structural Completion
Aircraft Carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) Reaches 50 Percent Structural Completion

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) 11-13-2009 11-09-2013
USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) 08-22-2015
USS Enterprise (CVN-80)

John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) Lower Stern Lift

JSTARS Recapitalization

Lockheed Martin is pleased to announce that Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) has joined the Skunk Works Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) Recapitalization (Recap) team, which currently includes Bombardier and Raytheon, bringing greater value to the partnership, and the team’s ability to deliver a premier solution to the U.S. Air Force.

The Lockheed Martin Skunk Works-led team delivers a low-risk, affordable solution for the United States Air Force’s JSTARS Recap program (LM image)
The Lockheed Martin Skunk Works-led team delivers a low-risk, affordable solution for the United States Air Force’s JSTARS Recap program (LM image)

SNC, which previously qualified as a prime contractor candidate for the U.S. Air Force’s JSTARS Recap program, will perform modifications to Bombardier’s Global 6000 aircraft, and will help obtain the necessary airworthiness certifications from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and U.S. Air Force. This strategic partnership further enhances this powerful industry team to provide a system that will drive cost-savings, schedule and performance efficiencies for the U.S. Air Force.

«We are extremely pleased to combine forces with the Lockheed Martin-led team», said Ralph Pollitt, senior vice president of SNC’s Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) business area. «We look forward to contributing to the team’s success by applying decades of experience in modifying and certifying commercial and military aircraft for a wide-variety of users around the globe».

Lockheed Martin is the lead systems integrator for the program, while Raytheon brings its experience with ground surveillance, ISR systems, and JSTARS communications. Bombardier will provide its ultra-long-range Global 6000 business jet platform, which is less expensive to operate than modern airliners and is uniquely suited to the JSTARS Recap mission.

«SNC shares our team’s vision and commitment to our warfighters», said Andrew Adams, vice president of Advanced Systems, Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. «Together we will deliver a system that offers the optimum solution – quickly and affordably».

Special Operations

On June 20, 2017, at the Paris Air Show, Lockheed Martin officials introduced the C-130J-SOF, the newest Super Hercules aircraft configured for international military special operations requirements.

Lockheed Martin's latest C-130J variant, the C-130J-SOF, a Super Hercules configured to support international special operations forces missions
Lockheed Martin’s latest C-130J variant, the C-130J-SOF, a Super Hercules configured to support international special operations forces missions

The C-130J-SOF is the 10th production variant of the Super Hercules. This multi-mission aircraft is specifically intended to meet the unique demands associated with executing operations of strategic importance in support of international Special Operations Forces (SOF).

«The C-130J’s inherent versatility is capable of supporting missions across a broad spectrum of military operations, and this is amplified once again with the C-130J-SOF», said Orlando Carvalho, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. «As our global partners face increasing and evolving threats that transcend borders, they want a proven solution. The C-130J-SOF, is in fact, the solution that will ensure security is preserved around the world».

The C-130J-SOF Super Hercules provides the capability to execute Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) and psychological operations, airdrop resupply, personnel recovery, humanitarian relief, as well as infiltration, exfiltration and re-supply of SOF personnel.

With added special mission equipment options, the C-130J-SOF Super Hercules may also be configured for armed overwatch that includes a 30-mm gun and Hellfire missiles, helicopter/fighter/vertical lift aerial refueling, and Forward Area Refueling Point (FARP) operations.

«Our global partners said they need to support their SOF teams with a solution that is reliable, affordable, effective and integrated. They must support their teams in the sky, on the sea and on the ground», said George Shultz, vice president and general manager, Air Mobility and Maritime Missions at Lockheed Martin. «International operators want a special missions Super Hercules that’s proven and a true force multiplier. Today, we offer that solution to the world in the form of the C-130J-SOF».

The C-130J Super Hercules is the airlifter of choice for 17 nations, offering superior performance and capabilities, with the range and versatility for every theater of operations. To date, the global Super Hercules fleet has surpassed more than 1.5 million flight hours.

SmartGlider family

MBDA presents the new SmartGlider family of guided weapons, optimised to counter anti-access strategies and other emerging battlespace threats. Planned to become available for fast jets no later than 2025, SmartGlider forms a family of all-up-round glider weapons, with folding wings and a range of over 62 miles/100 km. This new generation of air-to-ground weapons is designed to counter new networked short- and medium-range surface-to-air threats, as well as moving/relocatable targets or hardened fixed targets.

SmartGlider family of guided weapons
SmartGlider family of guided weapons

The compact family member, SmartGlider Light, is 6.56 feet/2 meters long and weighs 264.5 lbs/120 kg. 12 to 18 SmartGlider Lights can be carried on an aircraft thanks to a Hexabomb Smart Launcher (HSL) capable of managing reactive strikes without affecting the pilot’s workload. As such, the SmartGlider Light will allow first-day-entry by saturating and destroying enemy air defences.

For general purpose missions, the SmartGlider Light can be engaged against a wide spectrum of targets, from hardened and defended fixed targets such as hangars, to relocatable targets that can only be destroyed from a standoff distance with significant lethal effects.

Last, MBDA also prepares a 2,866 lbs/1,300 kg SmartGlider Heavy able to carry a multipurpose warhead of more than 2,204.6 lbs/1,000 kg to deal with large and hardened infrastructure.

«The SmartGlider family considerably reinforces the air-to-ground capabilities of the combat platform, sitting between the bombs equipped with guidance kits and cruise missiles», explains François Moussez, MBDA Military Advisor. «Designed for use in high volumes in order to saturate air defences, SmartGliders are gliders that, thanks to a high lift-to-drag ratio and their integrated guidance and navigation, will feature a range of over 62 miles/100 km allowing the combat platform to stay at safe distance from the enemy defences».

Lionel Mazenq, Business Development Manager France, adds: «Our SmartGliders will integrate new technologies in their guidance and navigation functions, as well as multipurpose warheads. Thus, they will be able to reach and destroy the best defended targets, notably enemy air defences, thanks to a mix of optronics and radio frequency sensors that makes them robust against anti-access measures».

«Throughout thirty years of work on the SCALP/Storm Shadow and now on future deep strike, MBDA has gained an in-depth understanding of penetrative missions in hostile territory», states Antoine Bouvier, CEO of MBDA. «We have therefore been able to optimise the costs of the aircraft and missile combination and succeeded in designing a truly efficient weapon for use in high volumes that perfectly complements the SCALP/Storm Shadow and its future follow-on FC/ASW that we are developing through Anglo-French cooperation».

Final land test

The U.S. Navy successfully executed a test of the surface-to-air Standard Missile-6 Block IA (SM-6 Blk IA) at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico, June 7.

A SM-6 missile is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy
A SM-6 missile is loaded into a specialized container at the Raytheon Redstone Missile Integration Facility for delivery to the U.S. Navy

This test demonstrated SM-6 Blk IA’s improved capabilities and integration with the Aegis weapon system. The event was the third of three required flight tests successfully executed at WSMR. At-sea testing of the SM-6 Blk IA is planned to commence in the fall of 2017.

«This final land test is a critical milestone which demonstrates Blk IA’s improved capability», said Captain John Keegan, Program Executive Office for Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS) major program manager for surface ship weapons. «I am very proud of the entire test team for their extensive planning and technical rigor that went into execution of this event».

The SM-6 Blk IA provides an over-the-horizon engagement capability when launched from an Aegis-equipped warship and uses the latest in hardware and software missile technology to provide needed capabilities against evolving air threats. Initial Operational Capability (IOC) for SM-6 Blk IA is planned for the end of 2018.

PEO IWS is an affiliated program executive office of Naval Sea Systems Command. PEO IWS is responsible for spearheading surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems, and for implementing Navy enterprise solutions across ship platforms.

First JLTVs

An infantry brigade combat team of the 10th Mountain Division will be the first unit to get the new Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, or JLTVs, around January 2019 once full-rate production kicks in, said Colonel Shane Fullmer.

A Joint Light Tactical Vehicle does a demonstration run around Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, June 14, 2017 (Photo Credit: David Vergun)
A Joint Light Tactical Vehicle does a demonstration run around Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, June 14, 2017 (Photo Credit: David Vergun)

Fullmer, the joint program manager for the JLTV program, spoke at a JLTV demonstration and media roundtable here on June 14.

The brigade will receive 500 JLTVs on a one-for-one replacement of the unit’s current fleet of Humvees, he said.

Officials said that a total of about 100 JLTVs are being provided this year by Oshkosh Defense, the maker of the vehicle, at a low-rate initial production of about 10 per month to the Army and Marine Corps for testing.

The full suite of testing includes command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; reliability qualification; and live-fire, according to a chart provided at the media roundtable.

The Army plans to purchase at least 50,000 JLTVs and the Marine Corps so far plans to buy about 5,500 for a total cost to both services of about $24 billion, with production extending over the course of 20 years, according to Army officials.

Andrew Rogers, program manager, Light Tactical Vehicles at Program Executive Officer (PEO) Land Systems Marine Corps, said the Marine Corps is re-evaluating its order and may order upwards of 10,000. The first JLTVs for the Marine Corps, he said, will go to a battalion at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, in late 2019.

 

FOUR VARIANTS

Fullmer said there are four variants of the JLTV that will be produced: general purpose, close-combat weapons carrier, heavy gun carrier and utility. Of those four variants, each comes in two door or four door options.

The two-seaters have an extended bed and are built to carry up to 5,100 pounds/2,313 kg of supplies, he said. The four-seaters carry about 3,500 pounds/1,588 kg, including four Soldiers seated and a fifth manning the weapons turret.

Weapons that can be carried in the JLTV include .50-caliber/.5 inches/12.7-mm machine guns, Mk-19 grenade launchers and TOW missiles, he noted.

Requirements for the JLTV production included the ability to be airlifted by Boeing CH-47 Chinook or Sikorsky CH-53 helicopters and to have a similar footprint as the Humvee so they’d fit inside the decks of amphibious ships, Fullmer said.

 

DRIVING CHARACTERISTICS

Learning to drive the JLTV is a breeze, Fullmer said. The first item that a driver will notice is the floating suspension, which can be adjusted. So, for example, if the vehicle is in a 30-degree incline, the driver can flatten out the suspension to level the vehicle.

Also, the operator has a display that shows the condition of the vehicle, including the engine, transmission and suspension.

The venerable Humvee had great maneuverability and payload but very little protection, particularly in the underbody, Fullmer said, while the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicle had high protection levels but poor maneuverability, particularly in the mountainous terrain of Afghanistan. JLTV has all the advantages of payload, protection and performance, he concluded.

David Diersen, vice president and general manager of Joint Programs for Oshkosh Defense, said the JLTV has one-third the weight and half the price tag of the MRAP, and the JLTV is about 70 percent faster than the MRAP and much more maneuverable.

Diersen added that the JLTV’s Banks Engineering 866T Turbo diesel engine consumes diesel as well as JP8 and DF2 at fuel-efficient levels.

There have been discussions with the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center as well as Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency for future autonomous operations, he noted.

Finally, Diersen explained that Oshkosh was able to keep the cost per vehicle down because the company also builds civilian vehicles and therefore has an economy of scale advantage. «So, you might see a JLTV rolling down the assembly line followed by a snowplow and garbage truck».

Fullmer said the JLTV was kept on schedule and within budget because of cooperation and close dialog between the Army, Marine Corps, Oshkosh and the requirements and acquisition communities.

The JLTV in action during a media showing at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia