AAG first fly-in

Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) completes a first-of-its-kind recovery of an F/A-18E Super Hornet at the Runway Arrested Landing Site in Lakehurst, New Jersey, October 13. This event, conducted as part of AAG performance testing with the Super Hornet, follows more than 200 roll-in arrestments completed at the site since late March. The AAG test team conducted more than 1,300 dead-load arrestments on the U.S. Navy’s newest aircraft recovery system before involving manned aircraft.

Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) completes a first-of-its-kind recovery of an Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23-assigned F/A-18E Super Hornet at the Runway Arrested Landing Site in Lakehurst, New Jersey, October 13 (U.S. Navy photo)
Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) completes a first-of-its-kind recovery of an Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23-assigned F/A-18E Super Hornet at the Runway Arrested Landing Site in Lakehurst, New Jersey, October 13 (U.S. Navy photo)

«This milestone test event demonstrates AAG’s capability and signifies a big step forward in getting the system ready for duty on board the Navy’s newest aircraft carrier», said Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment (PMA-251) program manager Captain Stephen Tedford.

Computer-generated design of a complete one-wire Advanced Arresting Gear system schematic (U.S. Navy graphic)
Computer-generated design of a complete one-wire Advanced Arresting Gear system schematic (U.S. Navy graphic)

While roll-in and fly-in arrestments are essentially the same to the AAG system, conducting both types of traps enables the test team to ensure all operational conditions that the system will experience are tested. At the completion of AAG performance testing, an Aircraft Recovery Bulletin will be generated, allowing system testing with manned aircraft aboard Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78) to progress.

The Advanced Arresting Gear Cable Shock Absorber (CSA) absorbs the initial kink wave of energy created when the arresting aircraft’s tailhook engages the cross deck pendant, or wire (U.S. Navy photo)
The Advanced Arresting Gear Cable Shock Absorber (CSA) absorbs the initial kink wave of energy created when the arresting aircraft’s tailhook engages the cross deck pendant, or wire (U.S. Navy photo)

AAG is a modular, integrated system consisting of energy absorbers, power conditioning equipment and digital controls, designed as the follow-on to the Mark-7 (Mk-7) arresting gear. The U.S. Navy is currently utilizing the Mk-7 Mod 3 and Mk-7 Mod 4 designs on all Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. AAG is a new system developed for the Navy’s future aircraft carriers and will make its debut aboard the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78).

The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment program’s Advanced Arresting Gear team accepts delivery December 11, 2009, and installs the conical/cable drum assembly at the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) being constructed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey (U.S. Navy photo)
The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment program’s Advanced Arresting Gear team accepts delivery December 11, 2009, and installs the conical/cable drum assembly at the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) being constructed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey (U.S. Navy photo)

The AAG architecture, Health Monitoring Assessment and Prognostics technology, and digital control system provides built-in test and diagnosis, resulting in the system requiring less maintenance and manpower to operate than the Mk-7. This change in architecture is designed to provide higher reliability and safety margins, while allowing Sailors to focus on other areas of need. The system is also designed to allow potential arrestment of a broader range of aircraft, from the lightest unmanned aerial vehicles to the heaviest manned fighters.

The Advanced Arresting Gear team guides an electric motor as it is lowered into the pit at the Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS). The team has been working for months to prepare the site for commissioning and live aircraft arrestment testing slated for late 2015 (U.S. Navy photo)
The Advanced Arresting Gear team guides an electric motor as it is lowered into the pit at the Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS). The team has been working for months to prepare the site for commissioning and live aircraft arrestment testing slated for late 2015 (U.S. Navy photo)

AAG benefits:

  • Employs advanced technologies to provide higher reliability and safety margins;
  • Requires less maintenance and manpower to operate than the legacy arresting system;
  • Recovers all current and projected future carrier-based aircraft, from the lightest unmanned aerial vehicles to the heaviest manned fighters;
  • Allows for increased sortie rates, lower energy consumption and a decreased gross ship weight.

AAG Traps First Fly-In