Lockheed launched
Wichita

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team launched the 13th Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) into the Menominee River at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard on September 17. Ship sponsor, Kate Lehrer, christened LCS-13, the future USS Wichita, in U.S. Navy tradition by breaking a champagne bottle across the ship’s bow just prior to the launch.

The 13th Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Wichita, launches sideways into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin on September 17. Once commissioned, LCS-13 will be the third ship to carry the name of Wichita, Kansas
The 13th Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Wichita, launches sideways into the Menominee River in Marinette, Wisconsin on September 17. Once commissioned, LCS-13 will be the third ship to carry the name of Wichita, Kansas

«It is an honor and privilege to serve as the sponsor of the future USS Wichita and to be a part of this major milestone in the ship’s journey towards joining the great U.S. Navy fleet», Lehrer said. «I look forward and to an ongoing relationship with Wichita’s future crews and their families throughout the ship’s service».

USS Wichita (LCS-13) will undergo additional outfitting and testing at Fincantieri Marinette Marine before the ship’s anticipated delivery next year.

«The christening and launch of LCS-13 marks an important step in her journey towards joining the fleet», said Joe North, vice president of Littoral Ships and Systems. «The Freedom-variant LCS plays a critical role in the U.S. Navy’s maritime security strategy, and we are committed to getting LCS-13 and her highly capable sister ships into combatant commanders’ hands as quickly as possible».

The Lockheed Martin-led industry team is currently in full-rate production of the Freedom-variant, with six ships under construction at Fincantieri Marinette Marine and three more in long-lead material procurement. The ship’s design and open architecture allows the U.S. Navy to rapidly acquire and deploy a fleet of highly flexible and capable ships at a fraction of the cost of other platforms.

«Fincantieri Marinette Marine is proud to christen and launch another Freedom-variant warship that will enable our Navy to carry out its missions where and when needed», said Jan Allman, Fincantieri Marinette Marine president and CEO. «We continue to optimize our production processes and leverage the craftsmanship and skills of our employees to produce these high quality vessels for our sailors».

USS Wichita (LCS-13) will be the third U.S. Navy ship named USS Wichita. Previous ships to bear the name included a World War II heavy cruiser (CA-45) and a Wichita-class Replenishment Oiler (AOR-1).

The Lockheed Martin-led LCS team is comprised of shipbuilder Fincantieri Marinette Marine, naval architect Gibbs & Cox, and more than 500 suppliers in 37 states. The Freedom-variant’s steel monohull is based on a proven, survivable design recognized for its stability and reliability. With 40 percent reconfigurable shipboard space, the hull is ideally suited to accommodate additional lethality and survivability upgrades associated with the Freedom-variant Frigate.

Ship sponsor Kate Lehrer breaks a bottle of champagne across the bow during the christening ceremony for the nation’s 13th Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Wichita, at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard on September 17
Ship sponsor Kate Lehrer breaks a bottle of champagne across the bow during the christening ceremony for the nation’s 13th Littoral Combat Ship, the future USS Wichita, at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard on September 17

 

Ship Design Specifications

Hull Advanced semiplaning steel monohull
Length Overall 389 feet/118.6 m
Beam Overall 57 feet/17.5 m
Draft 13.5 feet/4.1 m
Full Load Displacement Approximately 3,200 metric tons
Top Speed Greater than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range at top speed 1,000 NM/1,151 miles/1,852 km
Range at cruise speed 4,000 NM/4,603 miles/7,408 km
Watercraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 4
Aircraft Launch and Recovery Up to Sea State 5
Propulsion Combined diesel and gas turbine with steerable water jet propulsion
Power 85 MW/113,600 horsepower
Hangar Space Two MH-60 Romeo Helicopters
One MH-60 Romeo Helicopter and three Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (VTUAVs)
Core Crew Less than 50
Accommodations for 75 sailors provide higher sailor quality of life than current fleet
Integrated Bridge System Fully digital nautical charts are interfaced to ship sensors to support safe ship operation
Core Self-Defense Suite Includes 3D air search radar
Electro-Optical/Infrared (EO/IR) gunfire control system
Rolling-Airframe Missile Launching System
57-mm Main Gun
Mine, Torpedo Detection
Decoy Launching System

 

Freedom-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Freedom (LCS-1) 06-02-2005 09-23-2006 11-08-2008 San Diego, California
USS Fort Worth (LCS-3) 07-11-2009 12-07-2010 09-22-2012 San Diego, California
USS Milwaukee (LCS-5) 10-27-2011 12-18-2013 11-21-2015 San Diego, California
USS Detroit (LCS-7) 08-11-2012 10-18-2014 San Diego, California
USS Little Rock (LCS-9) 06-27-2013 07-18-2015
USS Sioux City (LCS-11) 02-19-2014 01-30-2016
USS Wichita (LCS-13) 02-09-2015 09-17-2016
USS Billings (LCS-15) 11-02-2015
USS Indianapolis (LCS-17) 07-18-2016
USS St. Louis (LCS-19)
USS Minneapolis/St. Paul (LCS-21)
USS Cooperstown (LCS-23)
LCS-25

 

Future USS Wichita (LCS-13) Launches Sideways Into River

T-X Competition

Boeing and its partner Saab AB will use their two production T-X aircraft, revealed on September 13, to show the U.S. Air Force the performance, affordability, and maintainability advantages of their approach.

The Boeing and Saab T-X aircraft (Boeing photo)
The Boeing and Saab T-X aircraft (Boeing photo)

Boeing T-X is an all-new aircraft designed specifically for the U.S. Air Force training mission, and takes advantage of the latest technologies, tools and manufacturing techniques. It is an advanced aircraft designed to evolve as technologies, missions and training needs change. The design is more affordable and flexible than older, existing aircraft.

«Our T-X is real, ready and the right choice for training pilots for generations to come», said Boeing Defense, Space & Security President and CEO Leanne Caret.

The Boeing T-X aircraft has one engine, twin tails, stadium seating and an advanced cockpit with embedded training. The system also offers state-of-the-art ground-based training and a maintenance-friendly design for long-term supportability.

«It’s an honor to build the future of Air Force training», said Saab President and CEO Håkan Buskhe. «We have created the best solution thanks to great cooperation and a clear strategy since day one».

T-X will replace the Air Force’s aging T-38 aircraft. Initial Operating Capability (IOC) is planned for 2024.

Swedish defense and security company Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions ranging from military defense to civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents and constantly develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs. Saab is a $4 billion business with approximately 14,000 employees in about 35 countries.

SIGMA sea trials

The first of two SIGMA 10514 PKR naval frigates for the Indonesian Navy has successfully completed its sea trials as of 7 September. This is a major milestone on a project for which the first steel was cut in January 2014.

First SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate for Indonesian Navy completes sea trials
First SIGMA 10514 PKR frigate for Indonesian Navy completes sea trials

The assessment phase began with seven days of basin trials to ensure that the propulsion and safety systems were fully operational before the vessel made the challenging passage from the PT PAL shipyard in Surabaya to the open waters of the Java Sea. There then followed two weeks of sea trials that included tests of a weapons system and the combat radar and commissioning of the sonar. Noise measurements and cavitation observations were also carried out.

The trials were successful, with almost all the systems passing their assessments first time around. Some elements, such as the accommodation, require minor modifications and these will be undertaken prior to three days of final tests at the end of September.

The 105-metre/344.5-foot, 2,365 tonne PKR frigates are designed to undertake a wide range of missions in and around the waters of Indonesia. Their primary mission is anti-air, anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare. However, they are also equipped for maritime security, search and rescue, and humanitarian support tasks.

The two vessels have been/are being been built using a collaborative modular process operating simultaneously at Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) in the Netherlands and PT PAL shipyard in Indonesia. Each is made up of six modules, and for the first vessel four of these were built at PT PAL. The other two were built and fully tested at DSNS in the Netherlands before being shipped for final assembly at PT PAL.

The success of the programme rested on the two yards working together with the end client operating almost as a single unit. The strong relationship also allowed the massive technology-transfer programme to proceed smoothly, both in Indonesia and in the Netherlands.

The first Sigma 10514 is on schedule for delivery at the end of January 2017 following the completion of three months of crew training. Meanwhile, work is currently proceeding in both the Netherlands and Indonesia on the second vessel in the contract.

The first of up to two SIGMA 10514 PKR naval frigates for the Indonesian Navy has successfully completed its sea trials as of 7 September. This is a major milestone for a project for which the first steel was cut in January 2014

 

CHARACTERISTICS

GENERAL
Customer Indonesian Navy
Basic functions Naval Patrol Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), deterrence, Search and Rescue (SAR), Anti-Surface Warfare (ASW), Anti-Air Warfare (AAW), Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASUW), Electronic Warfare (EW)
Hull material Steel grade A/AH36
Standards Naval/Commercial, naval intact/damaged stability, noise reduced, moderate shock
Classification Lloyd’s Register of Shipping (supervision) 100 A1 SSC Mono Patrol, G6, LMC UMS
DIMENSIONS
Length overall (o.a.) 345 feet/105.11 m
Beam Moulded (mld) 46.6 feet/14.2 m
Depth no.1 deck 28.7 feet/8.75 m
Draught (dwl) 12.1 feet/3.7 m
Displacement (dwl) 2,365 tonnes
PERFORMANCE
Speed (Maximum power) 28 knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 14 knots/16 mph/26 km/h 5,000 NM/5,754 miles/9,260 km
Endurance 20 days at sea
PROPULSION SYSTEM
Propulsion type Combined Diesel or Electric (CODOE)
Diesel engines 2 × 10,000 kW Maximum Continuous Rating (MCR) Propulsion type
Electric motors 2 × 1300 kW
Gearbox 2 × double input input/single output
Propellers 2 × Controllable Pitch Propellers (CPP) diameter 12 feet/3.65 m
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS
Generator sets 6 × 715 kWE
Emergency gen. set 1 × 180 kWE
Chilled water system 2 × units, redundant distribution
Fire fighting 4 × main pumps +1 x service pump
Degaussing System
DECK EQUIPMENT
Helicopter deck Max. 10 tons helicopter, with lashing points
Helicopter operations day/night with refueling system
Helicopter hangar
RAS on helicopter deck PS&SB, astern fueling
Boats 2 × Rigid Hull Inflatable Boat (RHIB)
ACCOMMODATION
Fully air-conditioned accommodation for 120 persons
Commanding Officer 1
Officers 26
Chief Petty Officers 10
Petty Officers 36
Junior Ratings 29
Trainee Officers 18
Provisions for Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) citadel/decontamination
WEAPON & SENSOR SUITE
3D-Surveillance & target indication radar & Friend or Foe Identification (IFF)
Radar/electro optical fire control
Hull Mounted Sonar
Combat management system
Medium calibre gun 76-mm
1 × Close In Weapon System (CIWS)
2 × Surface-to-Surface Missile (SSM) launcher
12 cell Vertical Launching (VL) Short Range Air Defense (SHORADS)
2 × triple Torpedo launcher
Electronic Support Measures (ESM) & Electronic CounterMeasures (ECM)
2 × Decoys/chaff
Integrated internal & external communication system
NAUTICAL EQUIPMENT
Integrated bridge console, 2 × Radar, Electronic Chart Display & Information System (ECDIS), Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS-A3), reference gyro

 

Resupply Vehicle

Researchers and engineers showcased a Joint Tactical Aerial Resupply Vehicle, or JTARV, during a recent visit by commanding general of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM).

Researchers see a future JTARV flying low to the ground or at thousands of feet at speeds of 60 miles per hour/96 km/h or more. With a payload capacity of up to 300 pounds/136 kg, the vehicle could provide vital resupply at short ranges (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo)
Researchers see a future JTARV flying low to the ground or at thousands of feet at speeds of 60 miles per hour/96 km/h or more. With a payload capacity of up to 300 pounds/136 kg, the vehicle could provide vital resupply at short ranges (Photo Credit: Courtesy photo)

The JTARV, a rectangular-shaped quadcopter also known as the hoverbike, could someday make it possible for Soldiers on the battlefield to order resupply and then, minutes later, receive supplies from an unmanned aerial vehicle. In 2013, 60 percent of U.S. combat causalities were related to convoy resupply.

«Convoy resupply involves having a route clearance package, which means more vehicles», Sergeant 1st Class Daniel Guenther, an enlisted advisor at the ARL Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, told Major General Cedric T. Wins on the general’s first visit since assuming command of RDECOM in August. «Those need to be coordinated in advance. This negates the need for all that. Basically what this does is give us speed and agility on the battlefield».

Army researchers envision a future JTARV flying low to the ground or at thousands of feet at speeds of 60 miles per hour/96 km/h or more. With a payload capacity of up to 300 pounds/136 kg, the vehicle could provide vital resupply at short ranges.

«Anywhere on the battlefield, Soldiers can potentially get resupplied in less than 30 minutes», said Tim Vong, associate chief of the Army Research Laboratory’s Protection Division. He likened the concept to «Amazon on the battlefield». «We want to have options like that», Vong said.

While the current prototype is electric, researchers are looking at a hybrid propulsion system that may dramatically increase its range. They are also exploring increasing the payload capacity to 800 pounds/363 kg and extending the range to 125 miles/201 km.

«We’re also looking to integrate advanced intelligent navigation and mission planning», Vong said. «We’re looking to end up with a modular, stable platform that can be used for even more dynamic and challenging missions».

The laboratory began exploring the JTARV concept in the summer of 2014. They discovered a manufacturer, Malloy Aeronautics, and a systems integrator, SURVICE. The laboratory entered into a contract and quickly moved from concept to full-scale prototypes.

Earlier this year, ARL transferred the program to another RDECOM organization, Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center at Picatinny, New Jersey; however, the lab still serves as subject matter experts on aeromechanics, assessment, analysis, propulsion, intelligence and controls and materials and structures.

«We’re taking a spiral approach», Vong said. «We’re looking at adding sensors for obstacle avoidance and building a semi-autonomous capability. This will help the craft to avoid obstacles like powerlines, buildings, or trees, he said. It will also allow the vehicle to operate in degraded visual environments».

In June 2016, the Marine Corps joined the program to make it a joint effort.

«I’m very impressed», Wins said. «It’s my first opportunity to come out to the Army Research Lab. As the new commander, I’m just getting around to all the Research, Development and Engineering Centers and the labs».

The general specifically wanted to be briefed on the JTARV.

«I’m hearing a lot about it», he said. «I wanted to see what it was all about. It demonstrates to me the high quality of the workforce», he said. «It also shows what our people are doing and how they’re thinking about the problem of how the Army will fight in the future».

In addition to many other industry, government and academic partners, the JTARV project is teaming with the Office of Naval Research and Near Earth Autonomy, a company with many employees associated with Carnegie Mellon University, to demonstrate full autonomy in near future.

The general said he plans to make more visits with scientists and engineers across the command.

«I am interested in really getting an understanding of how this command works, how this command provides support to the operator and how we can convey that message to the Army – that we are focused on the priorities of the Army … that we’re focused on delivering capabilities to the Army that help the future force», he said.

The U.S. Army Research Laboratory is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to ensure decisive overmatch for unified land operations to empower the Army, the joint warfighter and our nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

Major General Cedric T. Wins, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, learned about a futuristic resupply vehicle from scientists and engineers during his first visit to the Army Research Laboratory September 8, 2016. Wins assumed command of RDECOM last month

Hobart Sea Trials

On September 13, the Air Warfare Destroyer Project enters an exciting new phase with Hobart commencing its first series of sea trials, Builder’s Sea Trials. This phase will demonstrate the functionality of the ship’s propulsion, maneuvering, auxiliary, control and navigation systems. Following Builder’s Sea Trials, in early 2017 HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) will undertake Category 5 (CAT5) trials to test and demonstrate the ship’s more advanced systems and the combat system performance.

Hobart being turned with tug assistance to enable further testing on her port side
Hobart being turned with tug assistance to enable further testing on her port side

HMAS Hobart (DDGH-39) will conduct Builder’s Sea Trials off the coast of South Australia over several days in September. Throughout this period the ship will be operated under the command of a civilian Master and crew, augmented by specialists from the Alliance and key equipment suppliers who will perform the system testing and trials.

Before the ship is put to sea, the AWD Alliance will conduct a comprehensive assessment to ensure the safety of the ship, embarked personnel, the environment and other seafarers. This assessment is defined as the Alliance Sea Trials Release Process and has three major steps; the Sea Worthiness Assessment, Ship Sea Trials Release and Sea Readiness Confirmation.

During Builder’s Sea Trials, whilst the ship is at sea, a dedicated shore support team will remain in constant communications with the Ship’s Master to assist the ship and ensure the success of the trials. In the lead up to Builder Sea Trials the AWD Alliance continues to complete a number of important alongside dock trials – testing the ships systems before it departs to sea for the first time. Tests include Inclining Trials, measuring the ship’s stability and vertical center of gravity, and Bollard Trials, testing the ship’s propulsion system.

Hobart, the first of Australia’s three new Air Warfare Destroyers, left the shipyard to begin her initial Builder Sea Trials. The second ship is due to be launched in December, and the third is about half-built (AWDA photo)
Hobart, the first of Australia’s three new Air Warfare Destroyers, left the shipyard to begin her initial Builder Sea Trials. The second ship is due to be launched in December, and the third is about half-built (AWDA photo)

 

Characteristics

Length 481.3 feet/146.7 m
Beam 61 feet/18.6 m
Draft 23.6 feet/7.2 m
Full load displacement 7,000 tonnes
Main Engine 36 MW/48,276 hp
Top speed 28+ knots/32 mph/52 km/h
Range at 18+ knots/21 mph/33 km/h 5,000+ NM/5,779 miles/9,300 km
Crew 186
Accommodation 234
Combat System Aegis Weapon System Baseline 7.1
AN/SPY-1D(V) Phased Array Radar (81 NM/93 miles/150 km)
AN/SPQ-9B Horizon Search Radar
Mk-41 Vertical Launch System (48 VLS cells: RIM-162 Evolved SeaSparrow Missile (ESSM)/Standard Missile-2 (SM-2)/SM-6)
Mk-45 Mod.4 5” (127-mm) 62 Calibre Gun (Range: 20 NM/23 miles/37 km)
Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control (2 × 4 launchers)
Electronic Warfare (EW) Suite
Very Short Range Air and Surface Defence
Nulka Active Missile Decoy system
Integrated Sonar System incorporating a hull mounted and towed array sonar
Communications Suite
Aviation Flightdeck and hangar for one helicopter
Boats Two Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats (RHIBs)

Royal Australian Navy Air Warfare Destroyer Hobart Sea Trials

Alternative Warhead

The first Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System (GMLRS) Alternative Warhead rocket has rolled off the production line at Lockheed Martin’s Camden, Arkansas, manufacturing facility.

A Lockheed Martin GMLRS Alternative Warhead detonates at the target during a test flight at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico
A Lockheed Martin GMLRS Alternative Warhead detonates at the target during a test flight at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

The GMLRS Alternative Warhead was designed to engage the same target set and achieve the same area-effects requirement as the old MLRS submunition warheads, but without the lingering danger of unexploded ordnance.

«GMLRS Alternative Warhead rockets are all-weather, time-critical, rapidly deployable guided munitions that return precision area-effects capability to the battlefield commander», said Ken Musculus, vice president of Tactical Missiles at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. «This first GMLRS Alternative Warhead round coming off our Camden Operations production line represents another example of Lockheed Martin’s commitment to constantly evolve the MLRS family of munitions to meet the ever-changing requirements of our customers».

Fully compliant with international treaties banning submunition weapons, the GMLRS Alternative Warhead rocket will allow all users of the MLRS to have an area-effects weapon in their inventories without the need to procure additional launcher systems. MLRS rockets with submunition warheads ended production approximately six years ago.

Lockheed Martin received the initial production contract from the U.S. Army for GMLRS Alternative Warheads in June 2015. Each GMLRS Alternative Warhead rocket will be packaged in an MLRS launch pod and will be fired from the Lockheed Martin High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) or M270 family of launchers.

Lockheed Martin has produced more than 25,000 GMLRS rockets at its facility in Camden, which has received more than 60 awards over the last decade, including the 2012 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the Shingo Silver Medallion Award for Operation Excellence.

Construction of
the carrier

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced on September 12 that its Newport News Shipbuilding division placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). As Kennedy begins to take shape in the dry dock, the ship’s cost and construction schedule continue on track with significant improvement over its predecessor, the first-of-class Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78).

Newport News Shipbuilding placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). Nearly 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015 (Photo by John Whalen)
Newport News Shipbuilding placed a 900-ton superlift into dry dock, continuing construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CVN-79). Nearly 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015 (Photo by John Whalen)

«We continue to focus on reducing cost, and we are pleased with our progress», said Mike Shawcross, Newport News’ vice president, CVN-79 carrier construction. «The incorporation of lessons learned from CVN-78 on to CVN-79 – and major build strategy changes to construct the ship a different way – are having a significant impact on our construction efficiencies, just as we anticipated they would».

Like Ford, Kennedy is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form larger structural units (called «superlifts»). Equipment is then installed, and the large superlifts are lifted into the dry dock using the company’s 1,050-metric ton gantry crane.

Kennedy is on track to be completed with 445 lifts, which is 51 fewer than Ford and 149 less than USS George H.W. Bush (CVN-77), the last Nimitz-class carrier. «Fewer lifts to the dock means we’re building larger superlifts with more outfitting installed prior to erecting the sections in dock», said Mike Butler, Newport News’ Kennedy construction program director. «This translates to man-hour savings because the work is being accomplished off the ship in a more efficient work environment».

Close to 90 lifts have been placed in the dock and joined together since the ship’s keel was laid in August 2015. Kennedy is scheduled to be launched in 2020 and deliver to the Navy in 2022, when it will replace USS Nimitz (CVN-68).

Huntington Ingalls Industries is America’s largest military shipbuilding company and a provider of engineering, manufacturing and management services to the nuclear energy, oil and gas markets. For more than a century, HII’s Newport News and Ingalls shipbuilding divisions in Virginia and Mississippi have built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. Headquartered in Newport News, Virginia, HII employs nearly 35,000 people operating both domestically and internationally.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
Propulsion 2 A1B nuclear reactors, 4 shafts
Length 1,092 feet/333 m
Beam 134 feet/41 m
Flight Deck Width 256 feet/78 m
Flight Deck Square 217,796 feet2/20,234 m2
Displacement approximately 100,000 long tons full load
Speed 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h
Crew 4,539 (ship, air wing and staff)
Armament ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile), RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile), Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System)
Aircraft 75+

 

Network-connected ship

Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Sperry Marine business unit announced the launch of CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system which allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany.

CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany
CompassNet, a network-connected ship heading management system allows for the deployment of different configurations which can be upgraded easily and affordably at the Shipbuilding, Machinery and Maritime technology show (SMM) in Hamburg, Germany

CompassNet allows multiple ship heading management controls through the groundbreaking use of standard Ethernet connectivity to link the heading sensors and the distribution portion of the heading management system. As a fully type-approved system, it provides improved efficiency for a wide range of sensors and controls configurations from a basic setup to more complex arrangements with redundant monitoring stations. CompassNet will benefit a wide range of vessels including high-end commercial ships, cruise liners, and survey vessels as well as military support and control vessels.

«The flexibility of CompassNet, combined with a significant decrease in the cabling required, makes the system particularly attractive to shipyards for new builds», said Jeanne Usher, managing director, Northrop Grumman Sperry Marine. «The reduction in both material quantities and installation time will create lower costs for shipyards and owners».

CompassNet improves system redundancy and resiliency by offering «plug and play» functionality through the use of fewer required control and display units. With a reduction in cabling requirements of up to 80 percent, the system reduces installation and commissioning costs. Fewer connections make it easier to enhance heading management requirements with additional equipment. Functionality is further simplified through the use of two 24V DC power sources for all components. Additionally, a Sperry Marine NAVITWIN V control and display unit allows for connecting up to five heading sensors. Besides the installation process, Ethernet technology in a Sperry Marine heading management system facilitates modularity and improves reliability, operational performance and consequently navigational safety.

Fast, agile platform

The U.S. Navy commissioned its newest Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), USS Montgomery (LCS-8), during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony Saturday, September 10 in Mobile, Alabama.

The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA
The Independence variant team is led by Austal USA

Montgomery, designated LCS-8, honors the city of Montgomery, Alabama, and is the second U.S. ship in our nation’s history to be named in honor of the capital of Alabama. Montgomery, Alabama was named for Richard Montgomery, a major general in the Continental Army.

U.S. Representative Bradley Byrne, Alabama’s 1st Congressional District, will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Mary Sessions, wife of Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama and a Montgomery native, is serving as the ship’s sponsor.

«The commissioning of USS Montgomery is not only a celebration of the partnership we share with the people of a great southern capital, but also of our nation’s highly skilled shipbuilders who, in building ships like Montgomery – the U.S. Navy’s eighth littoral combat ship – will help us continue to grow the fleet to more than 300 ships by the end of this decade», said the Honorable Ray Mabus, secretary of the U.S. Navy. «This great ship, and the sailors who serve aboard her, will represent the city of Montgomery, Alabama, and our nation around the world for years to come».

While the second to be named for the Alabama capital, a total of four Navy ships have previously borne the name Montgomery. The first USS Montgomery was a sloop, or schooner, that was in service on Lake Champlain from 1813 to 1815. The second USS Montgomery was a wooden screw steamer in the Union Navy during the U.S. Civil War. USS Montgomery (C-9), the third of her name and the lead ship of her class, was an unprotected cruiser that served during the Spanish-American War and in World War I. USS Montgomery (DD-121) was a Wickes-class destroyer commissioned in 1918 and later converted to a minelayer that saw service during World War II, where she earned four battle stars for meritorious participation in battle.

Montgomery is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation. LCS provides the required war fighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute a variety of missions in areas such as mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare.

The LCS class consists of two variants, the Freedom-variant and the Independence-variant – designed and built by two industry teams. The Freedom-variant team is led by Lockheed Martin (for the odd-numbered hulls, e.g. LCS-1) while the Independence variant team is led by Austal USA (for LCS-6 and the subsequent even-numbered hulls).

The LCS seaframes will be outfitted with reconfigurable payloads, called mission modules (made up of mission systems and support equipment), which can be changed quickly. These modules combine with crew detachments and aviation assets to become complete mission packages, which will deploy manned and unmanned vehicles and sensors in support of mine countermeasures, anti-submarine warfare, or surface warfare missions.

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules

 

Independence-class

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Independence (LCS-2) 01-19-2006 04-26-2008 01-16-2010 San Diego, California
USS Coronado (LCS-4) 12-17-2009 01-14-2012 04-05-2014 San Diego, California
USS Jackson (LCS-6) 08-01-2011 12-14-2013 12-05-2015 San Diego, California
USS Montgomery (LCS-8) 06-25-2013 08-06-2014 09-10-2016 San Diego, California
USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) 04-16-2014 02-25-2015
USS Omaha (LCS-12) 02-18-2015 11-20-2015
USS Manchester (LCS-14) 06-29-2015
USS Tulsa (LCS-16) 01-11-2016
USS Charleston (LCS-18)
USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)
USS Kansas City (LCS-22)
USS Oakland (LCS-24)

 

Field-proven vehicle

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK is demonstrating EAGLE, the internationally field-proven military vehicle, at DVD2016. In partnership with General Dynamics European Land Systems, General Dynamics Land Systems-UK has submitted EAGLE for the UK’s Multi Role Vehicle – Protected (MRV-P) programme.

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK Demonstrates EAGLE at DVD2016
General Dynamics Land Systems-UK Demonstrates EAGLE at DVD2016

EAGLE provides high protection and mobility on- or off-road. It is available in a range of 4×4 and 6×6 configurations and can fulfill roles such as Armoured Personnel Carrier, Ambulance, Recovery, Command, Reconnaissance and Logistics. EAGLE provides logistics commonality across its range of variants, offering lower maintenance and lifecycle costs.

EAGLE is an established product with more than 1,200 in-service with the German, Swiss and Danish Armies. In service with the British Army, there are more than 200 highly mobile and robust DURO vehicles, which, like EAGLE, are part of General Dynamics´ Light Tactical Vehicle Family. Due to recent contract awards, EAGLE platforms are currently in-production and available now for customer trial programmes.

Kevin Connell, vice president of General Dynamics Land Systems-UK, said: «EAGLE is an established and trusted vehicle that is used widely by European armies. Its range of configurations, alongside its high all-terrain mobility and protection levels, makes it the ideal vehicle to meet the British Army’s MRV-P requirement. General Dynamics’ extensive expertise in the delivery and integration of wheeled military vehicle fleets means that the British Army can receive these vehicles within their desired timescales. In addition, we are committed to maximising the manufacture of these vehicles in the UK and supporting further highly-skilled jobs here in the UK».

General Dynamics Land Systems-UK is currently developing AJAX, the British Army’s first fully-digitised platform. The first AJAX platform will be delivered in 2017 from General Dynamics Land Systems-UK’s Assembly, Integration and Test (AIT) facility in Merthyr Tydfil, South Wales.

Worldwide, General Dynamics Land Systems has a long pedigree and experience in delivering tracked and wheeled military vehicles, alongside specialist knowledge in complex, scalable Electronic Architectures. It delivers, amongst others, the Abrams main battle tank, Stryker and the Cougar Mine Resistant Ambush – Protected (MRAP) family of vehicles.