Christening of Portland

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the amphibious transport dock USS Portland (LPD-27) on May 21 in front of approximately 1,000 guests. U.S. Marine Corps Major General Christopher Owens, director of the U.S. Navy’s expeditionary warfare division, was the keynote speaker. «Marines love these ships», he said. «They are perhaps the most versatile ships in the fleet. And in this current era when the United States faces a variety of threats and potential crises across the globe, LPDs uniquely enable the Navy and Marine Corps team to adapt and respond to a full range of scenarios we might face».

Ship Sponsor Bonnie Amos christens the amphibious transport dock Portland (LPD-27), accompanied by (left to right) U.S. Marine Corps Major General Christopher Owens, director of the U.S. Navy’s expeditionary warfare division; Captain Jeremy Hill, prospective commanding officer, Portland; Ted Waller, a World War II veteran who served on the first USS Portland (CA-33); and Brian Cuccias, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)
Ship Sponsor Bonnie Amos christens the amphibious transport dock Portland (LPD-27), accompanied by (left to right) U.S. Marine Corps Major General Christopher Owens, director of the U.S. Navy’s expeditionary warfare division; Captain Jeremy Hill, prospective commanding officer, Portland; Ted Waller, a World War II veteran who served on the first USS Portland (CA-33); and Brian Cuccias, president of Ingalls Shipbuilding (Photo by Lance Davis/HII)

USS Portland (LPD-27), the 11th San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock, is named for the largest city in the state of Oregon. The state has a long history with the U.S. Navy, going back to the construction of hundreds of World War II Liberty and Victory ships at three Portland-area shipyards. Bonnie Amos, wife of retired Marine Corps Commandant General James Amos, is the ship’s sponsor and smashed a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow of the ship, officially christening Portland. «Today is about Ingalls shipbuilders», she said. «Today is about the pride in what has transpired to make this ship, LPD-27, the greatest ship and the best in her class».

Ingalls has delivered 10 San Antonio-class ships to the U.S. Navy with the most recent, USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26), delivering on May 13. Ingalls has received more than $300 million in advance procurement funding for the 12th ship in the class, USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28).

«Portland is the 11th ship in the San Antonio class, and she is the best LPD to date», Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias said. «Working closely with our Navy partner, we continue to improve on each ship we build. We’re investing, along with the great state of Mississippi and the Navy, in modernizing our facilities. Combine that with a hot production line and our talented and experienced shipbuilders, and we are uniquely positioned to provide our country with the highest-quality, most capable ships in our Navy’s fleet».

LPD-27 is the third ship named Portland. The first USS Portland (CA-33) was the lead ship of a new class of heavy cruisers. Launched in 1932, it was named after the city of Portland, Maine, and saw battle during World War II. The second USS Portland (LSD-37), an amphibious landing ship commissioned in 1970, was named after both Portland, Maine and Oregon. She completed 14 deployments to the Caribbean, Mediterranean and North Atlantic.

«Our number one congressional responsibility is the common defense of this nation», said Representative Steven Palazzo, Republican Party-Mississippi. «Part of our national defense includes amazing ships like the LPD-27 San Antonio-class amphibious ship. With the daily occurrence of global threats, it’s obvious we don’t need just more ships, but ships that are survivable and capable. After all, they carry America’s most precious treasure, our men and women in uniform».

The San Antonio class is the latest addition to the Navy’s 21st century amphibious assault force. The 684-foot-long/208-meter-long, 105-foot-wide/32-meter-wide ships are used to embark and land Marines, their equipment and supplies ashore via air cushion or conventional landing craft and amphibious assault vehicles, augmented by helicopters or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft such as the MV-22 Osprey. The ships support a Marine Air Ground Task Force across the spectrum of operations, conducting amphibious and expeditionary missions of sea control and power projection to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief missions throughout the first half of the 21st century.

 

General Characteristics

Builder Huntington Ingalls Industries
Propulsion Four sequentially turbocharged marine Colt-Pielstick Diesels, two shafts, 41,600 shaft horsepower
Length 684 feet/208 m
Beam 105 feet/32 m
Displacement Approximately 24,900 long tons (25,300 metric tons) full load
Draft 23 feet/7 m
Speed In excess of 22 knots/24.2 mph/38.7 km/h
Crew Ship’s Company: 374 Sailors (28 officers, 346 enlisted) and 3 Marines. Embarked Landing Force: 699 (66 officers, 633 enlisted); surge capacity to 800
Armament Two Bushmaster II 30-mm Close in Guns, fore and aft; two Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) launchers, fore and aft: ten .50 calibre/12.7-mm machine guns
Aircraft Launch or land two CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters or two MV-22 Osprey tilt rotor aircraft or up to four CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters, AH-1 or UH-1 helicopters
Landing/Attack Craft Two LCACs or one LCU; and 14 Expeditionary Fighting Vehicles/Amphibious Assault Vehicles
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)
USS Portland (LPD-27) is seen here in the middle of launch early Saturday morning at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula. Portland is the 11th San Antonio-class landing platform dock (Photo by Andrew Young/HII)

 

San Antonio-class

Ship Builder Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS San Antonio (LPD-17) Avondale 07-12-2003 01-14-2006 Norfolk, Virginia
USS New Orleans (LPD-18) Avondale 12-11-2004 03-10-2007 San Diego, California
USS Mesa Verde (LPD-19) Ingalls 11-19-2004 12-15-2007 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Green Bay (LPD-20) Avondale 08-11-2006 01-24-2009 San Diego, California
USS New York (LPD-21) Avondale 12-19-2007 11-07-2009 Norfolk, Virginia
USS San Diego (LPD-22) Ingalls 05-07-2010 05-19-2012 San Diego, California
USS Anchorage (LPD-23) Avondale 02-12-2011 05-04-2013 San Diego, California
USS Arlington (LPD-24) Ingalls 11-23-2010 02-08-2013 Norfolk, Virginia
USS Somerset (LPD-25) Avondale 04-14-2012 05-01-2014 San Diego, California
USS John P. Murtha (LPD-26) Ingalls 11-02-2014 San Diego, California
USS Portland (LPD-27) Ingalls 02-13-2016
USS Fort Lauderdale (LPD-28) Ingalls

 

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