Builder’s trials

On March 21 the future guided-missile destroyer USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder’s trials during which many of the ship’s key systems and technologies were demonstrated. In addition to systems testing, the Navy-Industry team was conducting numerous operational demonstrations in preparation for acceptance trials in April. DDG-1000 is the lead ship of the Zumwalt-class destroyers, a class of next-generation multi-mission surface combatants tailored for land attack and littoral dominance with capabilities that defeat current and projected threats.

USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder’s trials on March 21 (U.S. Navy Photo)
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) departs the Bath Iron Works shipyard for its second at-sea period to conduct builder’s trials on March 21 (U.S. Navy Photo)

According to Sam LaGrone, USNI News editor, on March 25 next generation guided missile destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) is back at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works shipyard after four days of successful builder’s trials, according to the service. The service will now prepare for next month’s acceptance trials ahead of delivery of the ship to the U.S. Navy.

During the four days of trials, representatives from BIW, USS Zumwalt, the Navy’s Program Office, SUPSHIP Bath and various technical subject matter experts, including Raytheon personnel, tested several ship systems including key propulsion and auxiliary systems as well as boat operations. These trials also served as a unique opportunity for the crew to train side-by-side with representatives from industry. The Navy will continue to assess system performance over the coming weeks.

The ship’s delivery and acceptance will only be for the ship’s Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) systems. The ship features a new integrated power system that is much more complex than existing navy ship propulsion designs that have reportedly resulted in schedule and cost increases for the production of the three ships in the $22 billion class.

Following delivery of the ship to the service, USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) and its crew will go to San Diego to have the bulk of the combat system installed in part to free up space for additional production at the shipyard.

Zumwalt (DDG 1000) returned to Bath, Maine, after successfully conducting four days of at-sea builder’s Trials on March 25 (U.S. Navy Photo)
Zumwalt (DDG 1000) returned to Bath, Maine, after successfully conducting four days of at-sea builder’s Trials on March 25 (U.S. Navy Photo)

 

Features unique to DDG 1000:

  • Eighty peripheral Vertical Launch System (VLS) cells, two Advanced Gun System (AGS) 155-mm guns, and two 30-mm Close In Guns (CIGs);
  • A stern boat ramp for two 7-meter Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs), designed with room for two 11-meter RHIBs;
  • Aviation capacity for two MH-60R or one MH-60R and 3 VT Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs);
  • It will be powered by an Integrated Power System (IPS) with an Integrated Fight Through Power (IFTP). This is created by an Advanced Induction Motor (AIM);
  • A superstructure with integrated apertures and low signature profile;
  • Advanced sensors including a SPY-3 Multi-Function Radar;
  • A wave-piercing «Tumblehome» hull form.

 

Ship Characteristics

Length 610 feet/186 m
Beam 80.7 feet/24.6 m
Draft 27.6 feet/8.4 m
Displacement 15,761 long tonnes/16,014 metric tonnes
Speed 30 knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Installed Power 104,600 hp/78 MW
Crew Size 158 – Includes Aviation Detachment

 

Next-generation destroyer Zumwalt (DDG-1000) underway for the first time conducting at-sea tests and trials in the Atlantic Ocean on December 7, 2015

 

Ships

Ship Laid down Launched Commissioned Homeport
USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000) 11-17-2011 10-28-2013
USS Michael Monsoor (DDG-1001) 05-23-2013
USS Lyndon B. Johnson (DDG-1002)

 

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