Christening of Omaha

Austal is pleased to announce that Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 12 was christened at Austal USA’s Mobile, Alabama shipyard on Saturday 19th December 2015.

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship
The Independence Variant of the LCS Class is a high speed, agile, shallow draft and networked surface ship

Austal USA officials joined Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and the ship sponsor of the future USS Omaha, Susan Buffett, in celebrating the christening of the nation’s 12th Littoral Combat Ship.

The Omaha is the fourth LCS in Austal’s 10-ship, $3.5 billion block-buy contract. With its shallow draft of 14.8 feet/4.5 m, the Austal designed and built Independence-variant LCS is an advanced high-speed and agile 417 feet/127.1 m combat ship designed to operate in near-shore environments, yet capable of open-ocean operation.

«On behalf of Austal’s entire shipbuilding team, we are proud to design and build a ship that will carry the great name of Omaha as she defends our nation», said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. «We’re equally proud to honour a tremendous American in Susan Buffett who has given so much to so many people through her philanthropic work, and now gives her spirit as the sponsor to this amazing ship».

Buffett, a philanthropist and current resident and native of Omaha, will serve as the sponsor to the ship. She chairs of The Sherwood Foundation, The Buffett Early Childhood Fund, and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation. She also serves on several national non-profit boards, including ONE, Girls Inc., and the Fulfillment Fund.

According to the Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, «The sponsor will participate in all or some of the milestones in the life of her ship … far beyond participation in ceremonial milestones, sponsorship represents a lifelong relationship with the ship and her crew».

The aluminium hulled trimaran was officially named after Nebraska’s largest city during an announcement by Secretary Mabus, February 15, 2012. He said the name was «to honour the patriotic, hard-working citizens of Omaha and the state of Nebraska for their support of and contributions to the military». She will be the fourth U.S. Navy ship named «Omaha».

The future USS Omaha (LCS-12), launched in November 20 and scheduled for delivery in 2016, has a maximum speed of more than 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h. The Independence-variant combines superior seakeeping, endurance, and speed with the volume and payload capacity needed to support emerging missions – today and in the future.

«I’m also proud to honour Austal’s workforce today – a group of some of the most dedicated and hard-working professionals I have ever worked with», said Perciavalle. «Their expertise and commitment to excellence is evident in the construction of these incredible warships».

Austal’s LCS program is in full swing with three ships delivered and six ships under construction at this time. USS Jackson (LCS-6) was delivered this past summer and was recently commissioned in Gulfport, Mississippi. USS Montgomery (LCS-8) and USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10) are preparing for trials and delivery in 2016.

Final assembly is well underway on USS Manchester (LCS-14) and recently began on USS Tulsa (LCS-16). Modules for USS Charleston (LCS-18) are under construction in Austal’s Module Manufacturing Facility.

The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace
The ships are open ocean capable but are designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance in the coastal water battlespace

 

The Independence Variant of the LCS Class

PRINCIPAL DIMENSIONS
Construction Hull and superstructure – aluminium alloy
Length overall 417 feet/127.1 m
Beam overall 103 feet/31.4 m
Hull draft (maximum) 14.8 feet/4.5 m
PAYLOAD AND CAPACITIES
Complement Core Crew – 40
Mission crew – 36
Berthing 76 in a mix of single, double & quad berthing compartments
Maximum mission load 210 tonnes
Mission Bay Volume 118,403 feet3/11,000 m3
Mission packages Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW)
Surface Warfare (SUW)
Mine Warfare (MIW)
PROPULSION
Main engines 2 × GE LM2500
2 × MTU 20V 8000
Waterjets 4 × Wartsila steerable
Bow thruster Retractable azimuthing
PERFORMANCE
Speed 40 knots/46 mph/74 km/h
Range 3,500 NM/4,028 miles/6,482 km
Operational limitation Survival in Sea State 8
MISSION/LOGISTICS DECK
Deck area >21,527.8 feet2/2,000 m2
Launch and recovery Twin boom extending crane
Loading Side ramp
Internal elevator to hanger
Launch/Recover Watercraft Sea State 4
FLIGHT DECK AND HANGER
Flight deck dimensions 2 × SH-60 or 1 × CH-53 or multiple Unmanned Aerial Vehicles/Vertical Take-off and Land Tactical Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs/VTUAVs)
Hanger Aircraft stowage & maintenance for 2 × SH-60
Launch/Recover Aircraft Sea State 5
WEAPONS AND SENSORS
Standard 1 × 57-mm gun
4 × 12.7-mm/.50 caliber guns
1 × Surface-to-Air Missile (SAM) launcher
3 × weapons modules
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system
LCS delivers combat capability from core self-defense systems in concert with rapidly interchangeable, modular mission packages and an open architecture command and control system

 

Ship list

USS Independence (LCS-2)

USS Coronado (LCS-4)

USS Jackson (LCS-6)

USS Montgomery (LCS-8)

USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS-10)

USS Omaha (LCS-12)

USS Manchester (LCS-14)

USS Tulsa (LCS-16)

USS Charleston (LCS-18)

USS Cincinnati (LCS-20)

USS Kansas City (LCS-22)

Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates
Modularity maximizes the flexibility of LCS and enables commanders to meet changing warfare needs, while also supporting faster, easier technological updates

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