Navy Accepts MUOS

Following successful completion of on-orbit testing, the U.S. Navy accepted the third Lockheed Martin-built Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) satellite.

MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California
MUOS-4, the next satellite scheduled to join the MUOS network later this year, is in final assembly and test at Lockheed Martin’s satellite manufacturing facility in Sunnyvale, California

Launched January 20, MUOS-3 is the latest addition to a network of orbiting satellites and relay ground stations that is revolutionizing secure communications for mobile military forces. Users with operational MUOS terminals can seamlessly connect around the globe, beyond line-of-sight, with new smartphone-like capabilities, including simultaneous and crystal-clear voice, video and mission data, on a high-speed Internet Protocol-based system.

«MUOS is a game-changer in communications for every branch of our military, which all have mobile users who will benefit from these new capabilities», said Iris Bombelyn, Lockheed Martin’s vice president for narrowband communications. «This latest satellite will expand the MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe, including significantly more coverage north and south than the current legacy voice-only system».

With on-orbit testing complete, MUOS-3 is being relocated to its on-orbit operational slot in preparation for operational acceptance.

The MUOS network is expected to provide near global coverage before year-end. MUOS-1 and MUOS-2, launched respectively in 2012 and 2013, are already operational and providing high-quality voice communications. Lockheed Martin handed over the last of four required ground stations to the Navy in February. MUOS-4 is expected to launch later this year.

The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations
The system consists of four satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) with one on-orbit spare and a fiber optic terrestrial network connecting four ground stations

 

Communication Service Types

Voice:                                                Conversational and recognition voice

Data:                                                  Low data rate telemetry, short digital messaging, imagery transfer, file transfer, electronic mail, remote computer access, remote sensor reception, sporadic messaging for distributed applications, video, video teleconferencing

Mixed Voice and Data Services:      Mixed transport of voice and data

 

Communication Characteristics

Satellites:

4 GEO satellites and an on-orbit spare. 16 WCDMA beams per satellite. Satellite carries MUOS WCDMA and legacy UHF SATCOM payloads

Access Type:                              WCDMA

Data Rates:                                 Up to 384 kbps on the move

Bandwidth:                                 Four 5-MHz carriers

Transport Network:              IPv4 and IPv6 dual stack network

DoD Teleport:                          Portal to Defense Information Systems Network:                                     DSN, SIPRNET, NIPRNET

Access Type:                             Legacy UHF SATCOM

Bandwidth:                               17 25-kHz and 21 5-kHz channels

This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe
This third satellite extends MUOS network’s coverage over more than three-quarters of the globe

John F. Kennedy

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) received a $3.35 billion contract award for the detail design and construction of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79), the second ship in the Gerald R. Ford class of carriers. The work will be performed at the company’s Newport News Shipbuilding division. The company also received a $941 million modification to an existing construction preparation contract to continue material procurement and manufacturing in support of the ship.

A composite photo illustration representing the Ford-class aircraft carrier, USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)
A composite photo illustration representing the Ford-class aircraft carrier, USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)

Contract work includes aircraft carrier construction, ship design activities, engineering services, procurement of materials and hardware to support construction and logistics activities.

«These awards are important, not only for the shipbuilders at Newport News Shipbuilding, but for the thousands of suppliers nationwide who provide the steel, pipe, cable, paint and equipment that goes into this cutting-edge defense platform – and for the sailors who will sail her», said Mike Shawcross, Newport News Shipbuilding’s vice president, John F. Kennedy (CVN-79) carrier construction. «We look forward to continuing to implement lessons learned from the first-of-the-class ship, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), in the construction of Kennedy and delivering the next great carrier to the Navy».

John F. Kennedy’s first steel was cut in December 2010. Since then, more than 450 of the ship’s 1,100 structural units have been constructed under a construction preparation contract that will be used to start erecting the hull. The ship’s keel-laying ceremony is scheduled for August 22.

John F. Kennedy will continue the legacy of highly capable U.S. Navy nuclear-powered aircraft carrier platforms. Ford-class enhancements incorporated into the design include flight deck changes, improved weapons handling systems and a redesigned island, all resulting in increased aircraft sortie-generation rates. The Ford class also features new nuclear power plants, increased electrical power-generation capacity, allowance for future technologies, and reduced workload for sailors, translating to a smaller crew size and reduced operating costs for the Navy.

This massive building block set will become an aircraft carrier - John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)
This massive building block set will become an aircraft carrier – John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)

 

General Characteristics

Builder Newport News Shipbuilding, Virginia
Propulsion 2 A1B nuclear reactors, 4 shafts
Length 1,092 feet/333 m
Beam 134 feet/41 m
Flight Deck Width 256 feet/78 m
Flight Deck Square 217,796 feet2/20,234 m2
Displacement approximately 100,000 long tons full load
Speed 30+ knots/34.5+ mph/55.5+ km/h
Crew 4,539 (ship, air wing and staff)
Armament ESSM (Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile), RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile), Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS (Close-In Weapon System)
Aircraft 75+
Ships USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78);USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79)
The carrier, under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding, is the second Ford-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the second U.S. Navy carrier named for the 35th U. S. President
The carrier, under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding, is the second Ford-class nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the second U.S. Navy carrier named for the 35th U. S. President

NATO’s First Hawk

Expanding NATO’s joint Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) capability, Northrop Grumman Corporation and its industry partners together with NATO leaders unveiled the first NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) aircraft to an audience of customers, distinguished guests, employees and community leaders on June 4, 2015 in Palmdale, California.

Northrop Grumman, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) officials and industry team representatives unveiled the first NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) aircraft in Palmdale, California (Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman)
Northrop Grumman, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) officials and industry team representatives unveiled the first NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS) aircraft in Palmdale, California (Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman)

The unmanned aircraft, a wide area surveillance Global Hawk, is part of a broader system of systems solution that will advance the Alliance’s evolving ISR needs during a full range of NATO’s missions such as protection of ground troops and civilian populations, border control and maritime safety, the fight against terrorism, crisis management and humanitarian assistance in natural disasters.

«This marks a significant step forward in achieving NATO’s goal of acquiring NATO-owned and operated AGS Core Capability», said Erling Wang, chairman of the NATO AGS Management Organization (NAGSMO). «What you see here today is the result of one of the commitments made at the 2012 NATO Summit – to bring this advanced and critical persistent ISR capability to the Alliance to help ensure we can continue to address the range of challenges our member and other allied nations face».

The NATO-owned and operated program comprises five air vehicles and fixed, mobile and transportable ground stations. Northrop Grumman’s primary industrial team includes Airbus Defence and Space (Germany), Selex ES (Italy) and Kongsberg (Norway), as well as leading defense companies from all participating countries.

The industries of the 15 participating nations (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia and the United States), are each contributing to the delivery of the AGS system. All 28 Alliance nations will take part in the long-term support of the program.

Northrop Grumman RQ-4 NATO AGS UAV
Northrop Grumman RQ-4 NATO AGS UAV

«We are establishing the necessary ground stations, command and control systems, and training and logistics support services at the NATO AGS main operating base at Sigonella Air Base in Italy», stated Jim Edge, general manager of the NATO AGS Management Agency.

With the ability to fly for up to 30 hours at a time, the high-altitude long-endurance system will provide NATO leaders with persistent global situational awareness. The aircraft is equipped with leading-edge technology, including the Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP) sensor. The MP-RTIP will provide critical data to commanders during operations in any weather, day or night. The NATO AGS system will also be able to fuse sensor data, continuously detect and track moving objects and provide detailed imagery.

«The level of collaboration required to bring together successfully so many international partners in the development of this tremendous system of systems capability for NATO speaks to the commitment and strength of the trans-Atlantic relationships we have built with our key partners, to deliver what is truly a European program», said Janis Pamiljans, sector vice president and general manager, unmanned systems, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems.

Northrop Grumman is a leading global security company providing innovative systems, products and solutions in unmanned systems, cyber, Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR), and logistics and modernization to government and commercial customers worldwide.

 

NATO AGS Programme

The airborne entity is based on a modified RQ-4 Block 40 High-Altitude, Long-Endurance Unmanned Air Vehicle (HALE UAV), enhanced to support NATO specific interoperability and communications requirements. The UAV is equipped with state-of-the-art, multi-mode, Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP) ground surveillance radar sensor [Providing concurrent terrestrial and maritime Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) information in all-weather, day or night operations], enhanced with an extensive suite of network-centric enabled Line-Of-Sight (LOS) and Beyond-Line-Of-Sight (BLOS) long-range, wide-band data links.

First of five NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance System aircraft
First of five NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance System aircraft

The European-sourced ground entities include a number of mobile and transportable ground stations, all managed by the Mission Operation Support (MOS), providing mission planning, connectivity, data processing and exploitation capabilities. In addition, they provide an interface between the AGS Core system and a wide range of interoperable interfaces for data exchange with interoperable NATO/National C4ISR systems.

The Air Vehicle Missions Command and Control (AVMC2) provides overall mission command and control of multiple air vehicles, coordination with interoperable NATO and national Command and Control, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C2ISR) systems, and coordination of the ground entities through the MOS across geographically dispersed theatres of operations. This AVMC2 capability provides multiple UAV command and control, theatre-wide Battle Management, Command and Control (BMC2) and sensor and information management within an integrated ground-based Operations Centre.

The MOS and AVMC2, along with the training and logistics support elements, will be located at the Main Operating Base (MOB) at Sigonella Air Base in Italy.

The AGS Core provides unprecedented real-time airborne ground surveillance and situational awareness information throughout the full range of operations for NATO and the nations. A system of systems, the AGS Core consists of air, ground, mission operations and support elements, performing all-weather, persistent wide-area terrestrial and maritime surveillance.

Using an advanced radar sensor, augmented with off-board Electronic Support Measures (ESM) and Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) sensors and Full Motion Video (FMV) information, the AGS Core fuses sensor data, continuously detects and tracks moving objects, and provides object emission profiles as well as imagery of stationary objects throughout the observed areas.

Each AGS Core ground entity and the AVMC2 exchanges NATO standard C2ISR data with the interoperable NATO and national systems, further expanding the situational awareness available to ground, maritime, and air commanders in support of NATO missions – anywhere in the world.

The AGS Core, supplemented by national systems, will provide unprecedented situational awareness to different levels of command in support of NATO forces engaged in the full range of missions.

Programme underway:

  • Contract Award at NATO Summit 2012;
  • Initial Operating Capability 2017;
  • Full Operational Capability 2018.
The NATO AGS aircraft will be a major contribution to NATO's Joint Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance capability and a key building block for NATO Network Enabled Capability operations (Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman)
The NATO AGS aircraft will be a major contribution to NATO’s Joint Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance capability and a key building block for NATO Network Enabled Capability operations (Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman)

 

Specifications

Wingspan 130.9 feet/39.9 m
Length 47.6 feet/14.5 m
Height 15.4 feet/4.7 m
Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 32,250 lbs/14,628 kg
Power Plant Rolls-Royce AE3007H turbofan engine
Thrust 8,290 lbs/36.8 kN/3,752.5 kgf
Maximum Altitude 60,000 feet/18.3 km
Payload 3,000 lbs/1,360 kg
Loiter Velocity 310 knots TAS/357 mph/574 km/h
Ferry Range 12,300 NM/14,155 miles/22,780 km
On-Station Endurance Exceeds 24 hours
Maximum Endurance 30 hours

 

NATO Alliance Ground Surveillance (AGS)

Initial Flight Tests

According to Dominic Gates, The Seattle Times correspondent, Boeing concluded the first phase of airworthiness testing of its 767 tanker prototype on June 2, 2015. This time the plane even looked like a real KC-46 tanker, though it is not quite there yet. This first prototype plane is testing the airframe and how it flies. The second test plane, which will be a real KC-46 tanker outfitted with working aerial-refueling systems, is to fly in summer.

Boeing said its Air Force tanker prototype completed a 4.3-hour flight on June 2, 2015, with a refueling boom and wing refueling pods installed, although that equipment was not functional (By: John D. Parker/John D. Parker/Boeing)
Boeing said its Air Force tanker prototype completed a 4.3-hour flight on June 2, 2015, with a refueling boom and wing refueling pods installed, although that equipment was not functional (By: John D. Parker/John D. Parker/Boeing)

On Tuesday’s flight, the Boeing KC-46 tanker prototype for the first time carried a refueling boom, a rigid tube extended back from the plane’s underside that is used to pass fuel to an aircraft flying behind and below the tanker. The prototype was also fitted with wing-refueling pods, which are used to refuel aircraft with different in-flight fuel-docking systems that fly behind and to the side of the tanker.

This equipment was not wired up and was not functional. However, the flight provided data on how these external attachments affect the jet’s behavior.

After the prototype’s maiden flight in December 2014, Boeing worked on the plane for five full months before it flew again. Then it flew three test flights on successive days last week. Tuesday’s flight lasted 4.3 hours and went well, said tanker spokesperson Chick Ramey.

Boeing has a contract to deliver to the U.S. Air Force the first 18 operational KC-46 tankers in 2017. The Air Force plans to buy a total 179 tankers under a $49 billion contract.

This first test plane will now enter planned ground testing, including Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification testing of the fuel systems. After that, it will return to the air for the next phase of airworthiness testing, which will push the limits of speed and altitude and support follow-on testing. The final two test airplanes in the flight-test program are expected to fly by the end of the year, Ramey said.

The KC-46 program office requested the warhead be custom-designed by the Weapons Division to evaluate the highest threat scenario possible (U.S. Navy photo)
The KC-46 program office requested the warhead be custom-designed by the Weapons Division to evaluate the highest threat scenario possible (U.S. Navy photo)

Moreover, it is said in the Defense-aerospace.com that the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) successfully supported the Boeing KC-46 tanker with the most detailed, advanced weapons survivability test series ever conducted at the Weapons Survivability Lab (WSL), China Lake, California on April 7.

«Excellent tests», said KC-46 lead engineer Scott Wacker, weapons survivability expert. «These have never been done before, so I’m happy to say that we met all our objectives. I believe that we are advancing the state of the art in understanding vulnerability in aircraft». (Source: US Naval Air Systems Command)

The tests, outlined by the KC-46 Live Fire Test and Evaluation Program (LFT&E), will be used to assess KC-46, system-level survivability in high fidelity, operational environments against ballistic and advanced threats. The results provided a wide range of data instrumental in mitigating worst-case scenarios for the aircraft, which directly improves and preserves warfighting capability. «There were over 330 channels collecting raw data, 10 high speed cameras recording 10,000 to 100,000 frames per second and 30 real time video feeds», said Eric Brickson, KC-46 LFT&E engineer. «We had a very extensive list of requirements and NAWCWD met them all».

Representatives from NAWCWD, Boeing, the U.S. Air Force and the Institute for Defense Analysis were among several of the organizations and stakeholders present to witness the event at the WSL. «It was a very successful test», said Col. Chris Coombs, Air Force. «We designed these tests against the aircraft to see how it would perform, so we’d know if the people, whether they are pilots, operators or passengers, could survive on this plane under the most relevant of circumstances».

According to the KC-46 Program Office, plans call for the procurement of 179 KC-46s to replace one third of the existing aerial refueling fleet.

The KC-46A is intended to replace the United States Air Force's aging fleet of KC-135 Stratotankers and provides vital air refueling capability for the United States Air Force
The KC-46A is intended to replace the United States Air Force’s aging fleet of KC-135 Stratotankers and provides vital air refueling capability for the United States Air Force

 

General Characteristics

Primary Function:                              Aerial refueling and airlift

Prime Contractor:                             The Boeing Company

Power Plant:                                         2 Pratt & Whitney 4062

Thrust:                                                      62,000 lbs/275.790 kN/28,123 kgf – Thrust per High-Bypass engine (sea-level standard day)

Wingspan:                                              157 feet, 8 inches (48.1 meters)

Length:                                                     165 feet, 6 inches (50.5 meters)

Height:                                                     52 feet, 10 inches (15.9 meters)

Maximum Takeoff Weight:         415,000 pounds (188,240 kilograms)

Maximum Landing Weight:         310,000 pounds (140,614 kilograms)

Fuel Capacity:                                     212,299 pounds (96,297 kilograms)

Maximum Transfer Fuel Load:  207,672 pounds (94,198 kilograms)

Maximum Cargo Capacity:         65,000 pounds (29,484 kilograms)

Maximum Airspeed:                     360 KCAS/0.86 M/414 mph/667 km/h

Service Ceiling:                                  43,100 feet/13,137 m

Maximum Distance:                        8,400 miles/13,518 km

Pallet Positions:                                 18 pallet positions

Air Crew:                                                15 permanent seats for aircrew, including aeromedical evacuation aircrew

Passengers:                                           58 total (normal operations); up to 114 total (contingency operations)

Aeromedical Evacuation:           58 patients (24 litters/34 ambulatory) with the AE Patient Support Pallet configuration; 6 integral litters carried as part of normal aircraft configuration equipment

Boeing KC-46 Pegasus
Boeing KC-46 Pegasus

Lithuanian Dauphin

On June 2 the Eurocopter AS365 N3+ Dauphin, the new helicopter of the Lithuanian Air Force landed at Šiauliai Airbase. This is the first of the three Search And Rescue (SAR) helicopters contracted for by the Lithuanian Armed Forces together with the Ministry of Environment from European Union (EU) funds. Eurocopter is planned to deliver and hand over the second and the third helicopters to the Lithuanian Armed Forces by the end of the year.

Technical improvements developed by Airbus Helicopters on the AS365 N3+ include a modular design of the mechanical assemblies, use of composite materials (i.e. Starflex rotor head, blades, airframe, etc.) and use of the latest generation of avionics
Technical improvements developed by Airbus Helicopters on the AS365 N3+ include a modular design of the mechanical assemblies, use of composite materials (i.e. Starflex rotor head, blades, airframe, etc.) and use of the latest generation of avionics

«We are retiring dated Russian-manufactured helicopters and continue to fit up our armed forces with western equipment. It matters to us that our pilots will fly more up-to-date, new and more efficient aircraft», Minister of National Defence Juozas Olekas says. Minister also underscored that the first helicopter will also serve to fulfil Lithuania’s commitment to the nations completing the NATO Baltic Air Policing Mission by ensuring SAR function.

As laid out in the arrangement of cooperation with the Ministry of Environment, the Lithuanian Armed Forces is committed to use no less than 75 flight hours for environmental observation and control annually. The AS365 N3+ Dauphin rotorcraft, delivered to the Lithuanian Air Force by the Airbus Helicopter, will complete environmental monitoring and control from the air tasks and SAR missions: search for people lost at sea, extinguish fires, transport patients or organs for transplantation, support state and municipal institutions in emergencies.

The Lithuanian Armed Forces signed the procurement contract with Airbus Helicopter on three Eurocopter AS365 N3+ Dauphins in October 2013. The total value of the contract amounts to roughly EUR 52 million. The price includes purchasing price of the three helicopters, all related equipment, training of pilots and maintenance personnel, and three-year after-sales services.

Lithuania is not the first European Union member state that has used EU funding for purchasing helicopters. Earlier, Spain bought rotary-wing aircraft in the same manner. Also, many European countries practise buying dual use goods to save and to the end of an economical effect.

The AS365 N3+ also incorporates cutting-edge technologies and the all-composite Fenestron tail rotor, which features high maneuverability, low external sound level and optimal safety for passengers and ground personnel
The AS365 N3+ also incorporates cutting-edge technologies and the all-composite Fenestron tail rotor, which features high maneuverability, low external sound level and optimal safety for passengers and ground personnel

 

AS365 N3+ Dauphin

The AS365 N3+ belongs to the Dauphin family, which is well known for its unique design. This medium helicopter has proven its ability to perform any kind of mission, anywhere in the world. It even excels in the most severe climatic conditions, such as high altitudes or hot temperatures.

The standard AS365 N3+ is fitted with the unique Airbus Helicopters 4-axis autopilot to ease crew workload and help simplify the most demanding missions, including SAR. It also features excellent forward visibility during an approach.

The AS365 N3+ is powered by two Turbomeca Arriel 2C turbine engines fitted with a Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) system. Not only can this aircraft take off in ground effect at maximum weight and in temperatures of up to +50°C, but it is also capable of taking off with a full load from sea level in Category A conditions.

The AS365 N3+ incorporates the all-composite Fenestron tail rotor, which provides safety, high manoeuvrability, exceptional efficiency and low sound level during flight. The Fenestron is also an unparalleled safety equipment for ground crew. Its sound emission is rated at 3.1 EPN decibels below the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards, making it the quietest helicopter in its category.

In addition to flying at very high speeds, its high power reserve and excellent One Engine Inoperative (OEI) performance make it a safe aircraft to fly over urban areas or to perform SAR operations in poor weather conditions
In addition to flying at very high speeds, its high power reserve and excellent One Engine Inoperative (OEI) performance make it a safe aircraft to fly over urban areas or to perform SAR operations in poor weather conditions

Characteristics

CAPACITY
Crew single/dual-pilot Visual Flight Rules (VFR) or single/dual-pilot Instrument Flight Rules (IFR)
Passenger transportation 2 pilots + up to 12 passengers with comfort seats
Corporate transportation 2 pilots + up to 8 passengers with Executive layout
VIP transportation 2 pilots + up to 7 passengers with VIP layout
Casualty evacuation 1 or 2 pilots, 2 stretchers and 4 seats
WEIGHT
Maximum Takeoff weight (internal or external load) 4,300 kg/9,480 lbs (All configurations)
External load capacity 1,600 kg/3,527 lbs
Useful load 1,926 kg/4,246 lbs
ENGINE
2 Turbomeca Arriel 2C, turboshaft engines, FADEC
Maximum power per engine (OEI 30-second rating) 717 kW/961 shp
PERFORMANCE AT MAXIMUM GROSS WEIGHT, SL, ISA
Maximum speed (Vne – never exceed speed) 155 knots/178 mph/287 km/h
Recommended Cruise Speed (RCS) 145 knots/167 mph/269 km/h
Rate of climb 1,321 feet/min/6.7 m/s
Range with optional auxiliary tanks (at RCS 145 knots/167 mph/269 km/h) 498 NM/573.5 miles/923 km
Endurance 4 h 45 min

 

Its low vibration level and high flight stability provide working comfort for medical attendants and a smooth ride for patients

Swappable package

Changing, integrating or upgrading sensors on a military aircraft can be an expensive, time-consuming and complex endeavor. Northrop Grumman Corporation’s new OpenPod sensor system, unveiled at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., overcomes these challenges by making it possible for maintainers to swap sensors in theater.

The first swappable package for Northrop’s new OpenPod will be an IRST sensor provided by Italy’s Selex, but in future other sensors are to include LIDAR or datalinks (Northrop photo)
The first swappable package for Northrop’s new OpenPod will be an IRST sensor provided by Italy’s Selex, but in future other sensors are to include LIDAR or datalinks (Northrop photo)

The OpenPod system consists of line-replaceable units and a set of interchangeable sensors that can be swapped out in minutes. Enabled by open architecture principles, OpenPod is the first of its kind to accommodate a range of sensors with one pod.

«The battlespace can change quickly. OpenPod keeps the complexity of the mission in mind by allowing warfighters to match the sensors to the mission quickly, giving them flexibility they have never had before», said James Mocarski, vice president, Airborne Tactical Sensors business unit, Northrop Grumman. «When you have OpenPod, you can have Infra-Red Search and Track (IRST), you can have targeting, and you can have communications without having to acquire multiple pods. That gives our customers a significant affordability advantage».

OpenPod will be available with targeting and IRST packages at launch, followed by communications, Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR), 5th-to-4th generation communications and other options in in the future. Because the pod allows for sensor changes without modifications to the aircraft or mission computer, OpenPod can be upgraded independent of the aircraft. That allows for more rapid and affordable upgrades and integration of new technologies.

OpenPod is the next step in sensor evolution for users of the AN/AAQ-28(V) LITENING family of advanced targeting systems. Any LITENING Targeting pod can be converted to an OpenPod, so operators can take full advantage of their existing investments, training and operational experience.

Opening a world of mission flexibility
Opening a world of mission flexibility

 

OpenPod: Enabled by open architecture

  • Building modular designs and disclosing data
  • Enabling competition and collaboration
  • Building interoperable joint warfighting applications – using OA frameworks
  • Identifying or developing reusable application software components & capabilities
  • Ensuring lifecycle affordability and planning for technology refresh

Next Generation of Podded Sensor Systems

Airborne Early Warning

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to Japan for E-2D Advanced Hawkeye Airborne Early Warning and Control Aircraft and associated equipment, parts and logistical support for an estimated cost of $1.7 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale on Jun 1, 2015.

The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment
The E-2D introduces a rotating, UHF-band, Lockheed Martin APY-9 radar designed to track objects as small as cruise missiles against the background clutter of a coastal environment

The Government of Japan has requested a possible sale of:

  • four (4) Northrop Grumman E-2D Advanced Hawkeye (AHE) Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW&C) aircraft;
  • ten (10) Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A engines (8 installed and 2 spares);
  • eight (8) Multifunction Information Distribution System Low Volume Terminals (MIDS-LVT);
  • four (4) Lockheed Martin APY-9 Radars;
  • modifications;
  • spare and repair parts;
  • support equipment;
  • publications and technical documentation;
  • personnel training and training equipment;
  • ferry services;
  • aerial refueling support;
  • S. Government and contractor logistics;
  • engineering and technical support services;
  • other related elements of logistics and program support.

The estimated cost is $1.7 billion.

A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities
A completely new radar featuring both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities

This proposed sale will contribute to the foreign policy and national security of the United States. Japan is one of the major political and economic powers in East Asia and the Western Pacific and a key partner of the United States in ensuring peace and stability in that region. It is vital to the U.S. national interest to assist Japan in developing and maintaining a strong and ready self-defense capability. This proposed sale is consistent with U.S. foreign policy and national security objectives and the 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security.

The proposed sale of E-2D AHE aircraft will improve Japan’s ability to effectively provide homeland defense utilizing an AEW&C capability. Japan will use the E-2D AHE aircraft to provide AEW&C situational awareness of air and naval activity in the Pacific region and to augment its existing E-2C Hawkeye AEW&C fleet. Japan will have no difficulty absorbing these aircraft into its armed forces.

The proposed sale of these aircraft and support will not alter the basic military balance in the Pacific region.

The principal contractor will be Northrop Grumman Corporation Aerospace Systems in Melbourne, Florida. The acquisition and integration of all systems will be managed by the U.S. Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). There are no known offset agreements proposed in connection with this potential sale.

Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit
Fully Integrated «All Glass» Tactical Cockpit

 

E-2D Advanced Hawkeye

The E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is a game changer in how the Navy will conduct battle management command and control. By serving as the «digital quarterback» to sweep ahead of strike, manage the mission, and keep our net-centric carrier battle groups out of harms way, the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye is the key to advancing the mission, no matter what it may be. The E-2D gives the warfighter expanded battlespace awareness, especially in the area of information operations delivering battle management, theater air and missile defense, and multiple sensor fusion capabilities in an airborne system.

Hardware with system characteristics that provides:

  • Substantial target processing capacity (>3,000 reports per second)
  • Three highly automated and common operator stations
  • High-capacity, flat-panel color high-resolution displays
  • Extensive video type selection (radar and identification friend/foe)
  • HF/VHF/UHF and satellite communications systems
  • Extensive data link capabilities
  • Inertial navigational system and global positioning system navigation and in-flight alignment
  • Integrated and centralized diagnostic system
  • Glass Cockpit allows software reconfigurable flight/mission displays
  • Cockpit – 4th tactical operator
  • Open architecture ensures rapid technology upgrades and customized configuration options
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander
The Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the Carrier Strike Group and Joint Force Commander

 

General Characteristics

Wingspan:                                              24.56 m/80 feet 7 in

Width, wings folded:                        8.94 m/29 feet 4 in

Length overall:                                    17.60 m/57 feet 8.75 in

Height overall:                                     5.58 m/18 feet 3.75 in

Diameter of rotodome:                  7.32 m/24 feet

Weight empty:                                     19,536 kg/43,068 lbs

Internal fuel:                                          5,624 kg/12,400 lbs

Takeoff gross weight:                       26,083 kg/57,500 lbs

Maximum level speed:                     648 km/h/350 knots/403 mph

Maximum cruise speed:                  602 km/h/325 knots/374 mph

Cruise speed:                                         474 km/h/256 knots/295 mph

Approach speed:                                  200 km/h/108 knots/124 mph

Service ceiling:                                      10,576 m/34,700 feet

Minimum takeoff distance:            410 m/1,346 feet ground roll

Minimum landing distance:            537 m/1,764 feet ground roll

Ferry range:                                             2,708 km/1,462 NM

Crew Members:                                    5

Power Plant:                                           2 × Rolls-Royce T56-A-427A, rated at 5,100 eshp each

Unrefueled:                                             >6 hours

In-flight refueling:                               12 hours

True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness
True 360-degree radar coverage provides uncompromised all-weather tracking and situational awareness

Special Forces Command

The German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) have awarded Airbus Helicopters a full-service contract for the new H145M rotorcraft – which is to make its military debut with the German Air Force later this year. This seven-year comprehensive co-operative support and services agreement will ensure optimal availability, reliability and readiness for the German Air Force’s fleet of 15 H145M helicopters (previously designated the EC645 T2), which are to be used primarily in missions with the country’s Special Forces Command (Kommando Spezialkräfte).

The H145M is equipped with a modern digital glass cockpit, Night Vision Goggle compatibility, and Airbus Helicopters’ advanced Helionix avionics suite with a 4-axis digital autopilot
The H145M is equipped with a modern digital glass cockpit, Night Vision Goggle compatibility, and Airbus Helicopters’ advanced Helionix avionics suite with a 4-axis digital autopilot

Airbus Helicopters´ responsibility includes e.g. the management and implementation of maintenance and repair activities, material supply and airworthiness. The company will locate a dedicated team at the Laupheim Air Base in Baden-Württemberg, South Germany, creating a close cooperation with the Bundeswehr technicians who will support these helicopters during their missions around the world.

«We are committed to providing high-quality, comprehensive coverage in this first full-service contract for the new H145M», said Klaus Przemeck, the Head of Airbus Helicopters’ German Military Support Center. «It will build on our track record of successful support for the EC135s used to train its pilots at the German Army Aviation School in Bueckeburg, where the fleet’s operational availability is at over 90 percent».

The twin-engine multi-role H145M is based on Airbus Helicopters’ enhanced H145 civilian and parapublic rotorcraft (previously designated the EC145 T2). In its military version, depending on customer´s configuration, the helicopter is suited to a wide range of military operations – including transportation, reconnaissance, Search And Rescue (SAR), fire support and evacuations of wounded personnel.

Airbus Helicopters completed the H145M’s on-time certification process this month, enabling further military qualification this summer and the start-up of initial deliveries to the German Armed Forces before year-end as the initial customer for this rotorcraft version.

The H145M’s power, range, endurance and payload capability provide a multitude of deployment possibilities, especially when operating in high-and-hot conditions at altitudes of 6,000 feet/1,829 m and temperatures of 95 deg. F
The H145M’s power, range, endurance and payload capability provide a multitude of deployment possibilities, especially when operating in high-and-hot conditions at altitudes of 6,000 feet/1,829 m and temperatures of 95 deg. F

With a maximum take-off weight of 3.7 metric tons/8,157 lbs, the H145M rotorcraft can be outfitted with mission equipment that includes a pintle-mounted door gun and the ability to carry weapons on external stores; electro optical/infrared sensors with targeting capability; as well as military avionics for communications, navigation and flight management.

A rope-down system is available for special operations, and overall survivability is enhanced by the H145M’s ballistic protection, its self-sealing fuel tanks, and electronic warfare self-protection against missile threats.

The H145M benefits from the robustness, low operating costs and high operational availability of Airbus Helicopters’ proven EC145/H145 family, with enhancements including Turbomeca Arriel-2E engines with dual-channel Full Authority Digital Engine Controls (FADEC), a Fenestron shrouded tail rotor, along with upgraded main and tail rotor gearboxes.

This rotorcraft’s maximum Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) has been increased by 50 kg/110 lbs, while its outstanding hover performance – even in One-Engine Inoperative (OEI) situations – is crucial for flight safety and mission success, especially during special operations and combat search & rescue duties.

Equipped with an incremental modular weapon system, the H145M can handle all types of operational scenarios, from conventional to asymmetric conflicts
Equipped with an incremental modular weapon system, the H145M can handle all types of operational scenarios, from conventional to asymmetric conflicts

 

Characteristics

DIMENSIONS
Length (rotor rotating) 44.72 feet/13.63 m
Fuselage length 38.35 feet/11.69 m
Height 13.12 feet/4 m
Main rotor diameter 36.09 feet/11 m
Width (blades folded) 8.89 feet/2.71 m
CAPABILITIES
Maximum Take-Off Weight (MTOW) 8,157 lbs/3,700 kg
Useful Load 3,900 lbs/1,769 kg
Sling load 3,307 lbs/1,500 kg
Maximum seating 1/2 pilots + 10/9 troops
ENGINE
2 Turbomeca ARRIEL 2E turboshaft engines
Maximum Continuous Power (MCP) 2×771 shp/2×575 kW
Take-Off Power (TOP) 2×894 shp/2×667 kW
2 min One Engine Inoperative (OEI) 1×1,038 shp/1×775 kW
30 sec OEI-power 1×1,072 shp/1×800 kW
PERFORMANCE AT MTOW
Speed (Vne – never exceed speed) 135 knots/155 mph/250 km/h
Fast Cruise speed (Vh – maximum speed) 132 knots/152 mph/244 km/h
Maximum range 357 NM/411 miles/662 km
Hover ceiling OGE (TOP), ISA 8,858 feet/2,700 m
Special operations teams can quickly access the aircraft thanks to its spacious cabin, which has two large sliding side doors and double clamshell doors at the rear
Special operations teams can quickly access the aircraft thanks to its spacious cabin, which has two large sliding side doors and double clamshell doors at the rear

 

MISSION VERSATILITY

  • Armed Scout
  • Special Operations
  • Light Attack
  • SAR
  • MEDEVAC/CASEVAC
  • Maritime
  • Command, Control, Communications and intelligence (C3i)

 

ROOMY CABIN

  • 10 troops capability
  • Excellent access from both sides and rear
  • Unobstructed flat floor with rails
  • Excellent exterior visibility

 

STABLE AND ACCURATE FIRING PLATFORM

  • Mission computer
  • Multi-purpose pylons with slaving and release units
  • IR/TV Electro Optic System
  • Night Vision Goggle (NVG) compatible
  • Laser range finder/designator/pointer

 

HIGH SURVIVABILITY

  • Agile, low signature
  • Ballistic Protection
  • IR Suppressor
  • Self-Sealing Supply Tanks
  • High crashworthiness (fuselage, seats and fuel cells)
  • Electronic Warfare System (EWS)
  • Redundancy

 

BALLISTIC & GUIDED WEAPONS

  • 12- or 7-tube rocket launcher
  • 20-mm cannon pod
  • 7-mm machine gun pod
  • Air-to-ground missiles
  • Growth potential for laser guided rocket

 

The H145M represents a significant addition to the German Air Force’s capabilities and offers a host of features that make it particularly well suited to missions carried out by the Special Forces Command (KSK – Kommando SpezialKräfte)

Third French Predator

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA‑ASI), a leading manufacturer of Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) systems, radars, and electro-optic and related mission systems solutions, announced on May 29 that it has delivered a third Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper RPA to the French Ministry of Defense. Delivered less than two months after contract award, the aircraft joins two other French Reapers in service, which together have accumulated over 4,000 flight hours since operations began in January 2014.

USAF MQ-9 Reaper
USAF MQ-9 Reaper

«This latest order from the French Defense Procurement and Technology Agency (Direction Générale de l’Armement – DGA) is a testament to Reaper’s ability to enhance the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) of the French Air Force in support of national, NATO, and other coalition operations», said Frank W. Pace, president, Aircraft Systems, GA-ASI.

Pilots and sensor operators from Drone Squadron 1/33 ‘Belfort,’ 709 Air Base Cognac-Château Bernard are performing mission operations to include delivering increased battlefield situational awareness, augmenting combat search and rescue, and providing ground troop support. A total of 12 aircraft are planned to be in service by 2019.

The multi-mission Predator B is a long-endurance, medium-high-altitude RPA that can be used for ISR as well as targeting missions. The current aircraft configuration features an extensive payload capacity (850 lbs/386 kg internally, 3,000 lbs/1,361 kg externally), with a maximum altitude of 50,000 feet/15,240 meters, and can stay aloft for up to 27 hours.

Predator B is currently operational with the U.S. Air Force and Royal Air Force as MQ-9 Reaper and with the Italian Air Force as MQ-9. Predator B provides unparalleled close air support and persistent situational awareness over land or sea to coalition forces, demonstrating proven NATO interoperability. Some 240 Predator B aircraft have amassed more than one million flight hours since its first flight in 2001.

Italian Air Force MQ-9
Italian Air Force MQ-9

 

Predator B RPA

Designated MQ-9 Reaper by its U.S. Air Force and Royal Air Force customers, the turboprop-powered, multi-mission Predator B RPA was developed with GA-ASI funding and provides significantly greater capabilities than Predator. First flown in 2001, Predator B is a highly sophisticated development built on the experience gained with the company’s battle-proven Predator RPA and is a major evolutionary leap forward in overall performance and reliability.

Featuring unmatched operational flexibility, Predator B has an endurance of over 27 hours, speeds of 240 KTAS/276 mph/444 km/h, can operate up to 50,000 feet/15,240 meters, and has a 3,850-pound (1,746 kilogram) payload capacity that includes 3,000 pounds (1,361 kilograms) of external stores. Twice as fast as Predator, the aircraft carries 500% more payload and has nine times the horsepower. It provides a long-endurance, persistent surveillance/strike capability for the war fighter.

An extremely reliable aircraft, Predator B is equipped with a fault-tolerant flight control system and triple redundant avionics system architecture. It is engineered to meet and exceed manned aircraft reliability standards.

Predator B is powered by the flight-certified and proven Honeywell TPE331-10 turboprop engine, integrated with Digital Electronic Engine Control (DEEC), which significantly improves engine performance and fuel efficiency, particularly at low altitudes.

NASA Predator B ("Ikhana")
NASA Predator B (“Ikhana”)

The aircraft is highly modular and is configured easily with a variety of payloads to meet mission requirements. Predator B is capable of carrying multiple mission payloads to include:

  • Electro-optical/Infrared (EO/IR);
  • Lynx Multi-mode Radar;
  • Multi-mode maritime surveillance radar;
  • Electronic Support Measures (ESM);
  • Laser designators;
  • Various weapons packages.

Predator B continues to improve and evolve, making it more relevant for its customers’ emerging needs. A new variant, Predator B ER, has been designed with field-retrofittable capabilities such as wing-borne fuel pods and a new reinforced landing gear that extends the aircraft’s already impressive endurance from 27 hours to 34 hours while further increasing its operational flexibility.

In 2016, the aircraft will evolve again when its wingspan will grow from 66 feet/20 meters to 79 feet/24 meters to hold the fuel that was previously stored in the fuel pods. This configuration will deliver 42 hours of endurance.

This aircraft has been acquired by the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, NASA, the Royal Air Force, the Italian Air Force, the French Air Force, and soon others.

Guardian (Maritime Predator B Variant)
Guardian (Maritime Predator B Variant)

 

Features

  • Triple-redundant flight control system
  • Redundant flight control surfaces
  • Remotely piloted or fully autonomous
  • MIL-STD-1760 stores management system
  • 7 external stations for carriage of payloads
  • C-Band line-of-sight data link control
  • Ku-Band Beyond Line-of-Sight (BLOS)/SATCOM data link control
  • Over 90% system operational availability
  • C-130 transportable (or self-deploys)
Predator B ER
Predator B ER

Characteristics

Wing Span 66 feet/20 m
Length 36 feet/11 m
Powerplant Honeywell TPE331-10
Maximum Gross Take-Off Weight (GTOW) 10,500 lbs/4,763 kg
Fuel Capacity 3,900 lbs/1,769 kg
Payload Capacity 850 lbs/386 kg internally
3,000 lbs/1,361 kg externally
Power 11.0 kW/45.0 kVA (Block 5) (redundant)
Maximum Altitude 50,000 feet/15,240 m
Max Endurance 27 hours
Maximum Air Speed 240 KTAS/276 mph/444 km/h
Weapons Hellfire missiles
GBU-12 laser-guided bombs
GBU-38 JDAM
GBU-49 laser-JDAM
Payloads MTS-B EO/IR
Lynx Multi-mode Radar
Multi-mode maritime radar
Automated Identification System (AIS)
SIGINT/ESM system
Communications relay

 

Perform multi-mission Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance and “Hunter-Killer” missions over land or sea

Forward Deployed

The guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departed from San Diego May 28 for Yokosuka, Japan, where the ship will join U.S. 7th Fleet’s Forward Deployed Naval Forces. Chancellorsville will enhance presence in 7th Fleet as part of the U.S. Navy’s long-range plan to send the most advanced and capable units to the Asia-Pacific region.

USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia
USS Chancellorsville is named for the Confederate victory over Union forces under Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia

«It is Navy policy to forward deploy our most capable ships and there is no ship more capable than Chancellorsville», said Captain Curt Renshaw, Chancellorsville’s commanding officer. «That capability is not just a result of recent modernization, but is also a function of the readiness of the crew; and this crew has worked very hard to prepare for this day to ensure we are able to arrive immediately prepared for any mission».

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) completed a combat systems update through the Navy’s Cruiser Modernization program, making her among the most capable ships of her class. She is fitted with the latest Aegis Baseline 9 combat system, and will be the first to be forward deployed with that capability.

The Cruiser Modernization program is designed to upgrade in-service ships to keep pace with evolving threats while enabling ships to meet service life requirements and future operational commitments. Cruiser modernization enhances overall combat systems capability through numerous system improvements.

Future missions will include maritime security operations and cooperative training exercises with allies and partners in the Asia-Pacific region. This ship, along with her counterparts in the Japan Self-Defense Forces, makes up part of the core capabilities needed by the alliance to meet our common strategic objectives.

Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities
Chancellorsville carries guided missiles and rapid-fire cannons, with anti-air, anti-surface and anti-subsurface capabilities

Guided Missile Cruisers – CG

Modern U.S. Navy guided missile cruisers perform primarily in a Battle Force role. These ships are multi-mission [Air Warfare (AW), Undersea Warfare (USW), Naval Surface Fire Support (NSFS) and Surface Warfare (SUW)] surface combatants capable of supporting carrier battle groups, amphibious forces, or of operating independently and as flagships of surface action groups. Cruisers are equipped with Tomahawk cruise missiles giving them additional long range Strike Warfare (STRW) capability. Some Aegis Cruisers have been outfitted with a Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) capability.

Technological advances in the Standard Missile coupled with the Aegis combat system in the Ticonderoga class cruisers have increased the Anti-Air Warfare (AAW) capability of surface combatants to pinpoint accuracy from wave-top to zenith. The addition of Tomahawk in the CG-47 has vastly complicated unit target planning for any potential enemy and returned an offensive strike role to the surface forces that seemed to have been lost to air power at Pearl Harbor.

The Cruiser Modernization program aims to improve the Ticonderoga class by modernizing the computing and display infrastructure, and the Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) systems. Weapons and sensor sets will also be improved, in order to upgrade their anti-submarine capabilities, add short-range electro-optical systems that can monitor the ships surroundings without the use of radar emissions, as well as routine machinery upgrades to improve all areas of ship functionality.

Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)
Family and friends bid farewell from the pier as the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chancellorsville (CG-62) departs Naval Base San Diego bound for Yokosuka, Japan to join the forward-deployed naval forces in the Western Pacific (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Trevor Welsh/Released)

General Characteristics

Builder Ingalls Shipbuilding: 52-57, 59, 62, 65-66, 68-69, 71-73
Bath Iron Works: 58, 60-61, 63-64, 67, 70
Date Deployed 22 January 1983: USS Ticonderoga (CG-47)
Unit Cost About $1 billion each
Length 567 feet/172.82 m
Beam 55 feet/16.76 m
Displacement 9,600 long tons (9,754 metric tons) full load
Propulsion 4 General Electric LM 2500 gas turbine engines
2 shafts
80,000 shaft horsepower/60 MW total
Speed 30+ knots/34.5 mph/55.5 km/h
Crew 330: 30 Officers, 300 Enlisted
Armament Mk-41 Vertical Launching System Standard Missile (MR)
Vertical Launch ASROC (VLA) Missile
Tomahawk Cruise Missile
Mk-46 torpedoes (from two triple mounts)
2 Mk-45 127-mm/5-inch/54 caliber lightweight guns
2 Phalanx Close-In-Weapons systems
Aircraft 2 SH-60 Seahawk (LAMPS III)
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare
She also carries two Seahawk Light airborne multi-purpose system (LAMPS) helicopters, focused on anti-submarine warfare

 

Ships

USS Bunker Hill (CG-52), San Diego, California

USS Mobile Bay (CG-53), San Diego, California

USS Antietam (CG-54), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55), Norfolk, Virginia

USS San Jacinto (CG-56), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Lake Champlain (CG-57), San Diego, California

USS Philippine Sea (CG-58), Mayport, Florida

USS Princeton (CG-59), San Diego, California

USS Normandy (CG-60), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Monterey (CG-61), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Chancellorsville (CG-62), San Diego, California

USS Cowpens (CG-63), San Diego, California

USS Gettysburg (CG-64), Mayport, Florida

USS Chosin (CG-65), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Hue City (CG-66), Mayport, Florida

USS Shiloh (CG-67), Yokosuka, Japan

USS Anzio (CG-68), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Vicksburg (CG-69), Mayport, Florida

USS Lake Erie (CG-70), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

USS Cape St. George (CG-71), San Diego, California

USS Vella Gulf (CG-72), Norfolk, Virginia

USS Port Royal (CG-73), Pearl Harbor, Hawaii